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Corbyn - Labour's gift to the nation

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Jeremy Corbyn’s incompetence remains a reassuring certainty

It looked exciting on paper. A massive defeat for the government. Their flagship policy not just sunk but blown to smithereens. And a Prime Minister facing a no-confidence motion for the first time since Sunny Jim Callaghan was unseated in 1979 by Margaret Thatcher. And yet PMQs lacked sparkle. The mood was footsore, hungover, whimpering with fatigue. A historic day felt entirely unhistoric. Everyone wanted a break. May, her throat hoarse, looked knackered and bored, like Mick Jagger at the fag-end of a world tour. She gasped out some of her answers without grammatical ornaments. When Robert Goodwill sought her congratulations for a Scarborough firm that flogs fertiliser to China, she managed this: ‘Driving exports, driving investments, good for the north.’ But thank God for Jeremy Corbyn – a welcome point of certainty in these unpredictable times. As always, he was useless. He completely failed to exploit his advantage and he simply yelled at the PM for incompetence without analysing her inadequacies. And instead of building a case against her he huffed and flapped his way through a laundry-list of grievances: soaring crime, lousy schools, not enough cops, too many food banks, cuts everywhere, cuts, cuts, snarl, snarl.As a statesman he’s a disappointment. But this was a superb imitation of a department store Santa being dismissed for inappropriate behaviour in the grotto. His tut-tut list included the revelation that four million Brits now languish in destitution. (His reference was to those in ‘in-work poverty’). This is the finding of a UN gad-about hired to tour the world and accuse rich countries of abusing their citizens by giving them free healthcare, dentistry and schooling. Great job for the UN guy. Lots of travel. Comfy hotels. Easy conclusions. And guaranteed acclaim from rich poverty activists like Jeremy Corbyn and the fatcat charity bosses. Many backbenchers suggested ways out of the impasse. Kenneth Clarke repeated last week’s effort and honked about suspending Article 50. He was followed by the chorus of minnows in Remain Corner led by Nicky Morgan and Dr Sarah Wollaston. The good doctor wants to heal the body-politic with a repeat referendum. So does Ian Blackford of the SNP who helpfully told us what the ballot paper should say. Two options: Remain or May’s Deal. Such a short memory! Remain was rejected in 2016 by the voters. May’s Deal was trounced by parliament last night. And Blackford didn’t tell us on what date the result of the second referendum would be effaced by those clamouring for Referendum Three. Several backbenchers predicted that the EU would refuse to alter the Withdrawal Agreement. Well, no wonder. A travelling college of Brexit-cancellers has been commuting to and from Brussels for many months. The leading masterminds –  Blair, Grieve, Soubry and Umunna –  offer private tuition to Euro-wonks in how best to kill democracy by refusing the government’s requests and by jamming their heels into the mud to drain Brexit of energy. It may pay off. Even if Britain escapes on WTO terms there are other rewards. It’s noticeable that the busiest Brexit saboteurs are eligible for the highest honours. Sir Nick Clegg, Sir Craig Oliver and Sir Vince Cable may soon be joined by Dame Anna and Sir Chuka.

https://blogs.spectator.co.uk/2019/01/jeremy-corbyns-incompetence-remains-a-reassuring-certainty/

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Refusing to meet with May is also a gift, to the Tories.  They can just claim, with easy justification, that he has no plan at all and can't even put his personal differences to one side for the sake of the national interest.  Whereas if he went into the meeting, demanded that no deal be taken off the table, and its refused, he can walk out saying he tried but the PM is too stubborn and that nothing has changed despite her apparently conciliatory words.

 

Playground stuff.

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2 hours ago, stewarty said:

Refusing to meet with May is also a gift, to the Tories.

Jeremy Corbyn can meet with Hamas, Hezbollah et al but not the Conservative party.

 

:thinking:

 

 

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He's a backbencher, who seemingly has little desire to run the country.  Anyone who wanted to would be getting ripped into the incompetent Tories, non-stop, while the iron is melting.

Edited by Gonzo79

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I watched Corbyn at PMQ's this week. The PM humiliated the day before and there to be eviscerated in public. Instead, she walked all over Corbyn and left you wondering how anyone could want him as leader of their party, let alone PM. He's a low-grade student politician, hopelessly out of his depth, the Hugo Chavez wannabe of Islington.

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If he can't destroy May this week, I really can't see him taking down neoliberal, globalist Capitalism anytime soon.  

 

That'd be like Sheldon off The Big Bang Theory* taking on the Spartans in a sword fight.

 

 

 

*I only watch it for Penny

Edited by Gonzo79

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Corbyn and Diane Abbot must be the last people in the world you want to rule a country.

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9 hours ago, pete said:

Corbyn and Diane Abbot must be the last people in the world you want to rule a country.

The very notion of Diane Abbott holding a high-profile, high-ranking position within a national government is Armageddon-esque to me.

 

She comes across as being almost illiterate - and I think I am being fairly generous there.

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Just now, craig said:

The very notion of Diane Abbott holding a high-profile, high-ranking position within a national government is Armageddon-esque to me.

 

She comes across as being almost illiterate - and I think I am being fairly generous there.

I agree and I am at heart a labour person.

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