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4 hours ago, the gunslinger said:

Or it is using it's production domestically. Which it should be. 

It is most definately, but car manufacture and heavy industral exports are suffering from a treble whammy of Inflation, Europe wide distribution issues and other countries scaling back on non essential imports, as has been said, Germany had it good for so long, being the policy kingmaker in the EU and not having to fully  fund its own defence and also power, saving billions each year in the process. The cracks are showing and this is before the expected Euro bond crisis economists have been predicting that will require billions to prop up the most at risk economies, i.e. Italy this time. 

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18 minutes ago, ChelseaBoy said:

It is most definately, but car manufacture and heavy industral exports are suffering from a treble whammy of Inflation, Europe wide distribution issues and other countries scaling back on non essential imports, as has been said, Germany had it good for so long, being the policy kingmaker in the EU and not having to fully  fund its own defence and also power, saving billions each year in the process. The cracks are showing and this is before the expected Euro bond crisis economists have been predicting that will require billions to prop up the most at risk economies, i.e. Italy this time. 

What goes around comes around

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On 25/06/2022 at 12:11, Bill said:

One possible approach you might consider in periods of high volatility like this is the slightly riskier CFD (Contracts For Difference) route, whereby you can bet on prices falling as well as rising. You have to be one smart and committed cookie to trade CFD's on your own but there are brokers around who will take much of the risk away by doing this for you and only charge a % on you profits alone. 

 

There are no guarantees but people have been making a lot of money as markets have fallen, while the rest of us have sat and watched our value go down the drain. Just a thought.

Technically, CFD's arent really a way of betting on prices falling as well as rising, that is just shorting the stock (though, yes, obviously you can long and short stocks with CFD's).  What CFD's do is, by their very name, is allow you to "trade" stocks with a lower capital base.  Instead of paying $10k and getting, say, 20 shares in Tesla, you just trade the movement so the same $10k has you trading a much higher volume of Tesla shares.  CFD's can be MUCH riskier because you are leveraging and that leveraging can be fairly significant - so there is also a great risk of margin call.

 

I traded CFD's back in the day by myself but you really need to have some time to dedicate to the analysis just as you do trading stocks as a day trader as, essentially, you are still day trading (or swing trading) stocks with CFD's, but at leverage - probably need to have more dedicated time to do it - unless, as you say, you simply give your capital to a broker to do it for you.

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On 30/06/2022 at 09:40, Bill said:

Another God awful day in the markets. Pretty soon those savings and pension funds will be stripped bare and all that most of us can do is stand and watch it happen. There's almost no defence.

 

Perhaps Bitcoin has some attraction after all.

My defence, and it is little defence at all, has been to take my whole pension portfolio and stick it in cash.  I lose out on purchasing power due to inflation... but I don't get "double dunted" by the market drop.  Have been in cash since end of February, in which time the S&P500 has gone from about 7% drop year-to-date to 20% drop - almost feels like a win, even though it isnt.

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3 hours ago, Scott7 said:

Peter Mandelson agrees with that.

 

2 hours ago, Bill said:

You don't say

Even Mandelson can be right once in a lifetime.

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I hesitate to raise it but after market performance today we could be standing on the edge of a cliff - recession, inflation, run on Sterling, equity collapse.

 

Craig's cash strategy looks more sensible by the day.

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18 hours ago, Bill said:

I hesitate to raise it but after market performance today we could be standing on the edge of a cliff - recession, inflation, run on Sterling, equity collapse.

 

Craig's cash strategy looks more sensible by the day.

I won't lie Bill, it saddens me that my cash strategy seems to be the sensible, only safe haven right now... at a time when inflation is still running rampant and is eating away at cash in real terms too.  People are suffering badly - and pension funds are in dire trouble if the markets continue to drop.

 

Sad that losing 7% (or whatever inflation is just now) on cash is the "best" bet right now - it strangely has me sleeping easier at nights too

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I'm aware that a significant driver of high fuel prices is inadequate refining capacity, particularly for diesel, but with light crude wholesale prices now below $100/bbl and demand falling as much of the industrialised world approaches recession, for retailers to be still asking for £2 per litre is an absolute outrage. These are profiteering bastards but a price cap structure should have been put in place months ago, including VAT and duty reductions. 

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19 minutes ago, craig said:

I won't lie Bill, it saddens me that my cash strategy seems to be the sensible, only safe haven right now... at a time when inflation is still running rampant and is eating away at cash in real terms too.  People are suffering badly - and pension funds are in dire trouble if the markets continue to drop.

 

Sad that losing 7% (or whatever inflation is just now) on cash is the "best" bet right now - it strangely has me sleeping easier at nights too

I'm actually surprised my pension fund hasn't been hit harder, although that may yet come. I remember you saying a while back that you were intending to change everything to cash deposits and I did look at it briefly. What put me off were the interest rates available - which I can't see rising any time soon - and the need to spread it across so many investment points to get FSCS protection. My pension fund has already migrated towards less volatile investments such as bonds and cash, as well as into safety stocks. Time will tell.

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