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Showing content with the highest reputation on 29/10/20 in all areas

  1. When did we become such a good side that we can put in a 5/10 performance in a European group match and win the game and don’t allow our opponent a shot on target? I was in Luxembourg just 3 years ago, watching the worst result in our entire history, under the worst manager in our history, and I could only dream of nights like tonight. Thanks Rangers, any win in a European group stage will never be undervalued by this bear.
    8 points
  2. Statement of the night , well said and seconded
    4 points
  3. On the 29th October 1855 our Founder Moses McNeil was born. image upload Moses was from the east side of the Gareloch ,his father John was from Comrie in Perthshire and mother Jane Bain from Downpatrick in Ulster. He was a natural athlete Powerful and of stocky build,it was said that was known for his pace and he had stamina too. In the Ibrox trophy room is a cup won by Moses for a half-mile race at the Garelochead Athletic Sports on 1 January, 1876 and it’s the oldest Trophy that the Club has. image upload Moses played for the club he helped form for ten years, playing in the 1877 and 1879 Scottish Cup Finals. He was also a member of the first Rangers side to lift a trophy, the Glasgow Merchants Charity Cup in 1879. He actually left Rangers to join his brother Harry at Queen’s Park for a few months at the end of 1875 but quickly returned to his club. He was the first Ranger to play for his country, in a 4-0 victory over Wales at Hamilton Crescent Partick in 1876 and was capped again,when Scotland defeated England 5-4 at First Hampden Park in 1880. For a great deal of his playing career, he formed the Rangers’ left wing with his old friend and fellow Pioneer,Peter Campbell. Although being a member of committee during his playing days, he had little involvement after his football career was over.He did feature, though, on a number of occasions with his old pals in the Rangers “Ancients” team who played many exhibition and charitable matches. Moses led a nomadic lifestyle mainly due to his 20 year employment with the company Langs whose name was synonymous with the famous brand of whisky.Their premises which Moses worked from was on Union Street in Glasgow. During his time in Glasgow Moses lived at 169 Berkeley Street and 333 Dumbarton Road.These locations are among many others that we visit during the Founders Trail. During research for the Gallant Pioneers book an elderly lady was interviewed who until her recent passing still lived next door to Moses old house at Clynder on the shores of the Gareloch . As a little girl back in the early 1930’s she could recall him being known around the village as “The Rangers man’’, and that he was always very dapper in his suit and bowler hat. It was said that Moses would travel to Glasgow once a month to collect his pension, most likely from the Club, and then return later in the day with a spring in his step and a slur on his speech! image upload He spent the last few years of his life living with his sister, Isabella, in Clynder at Craig Cottage. She died in 1935, to be followed by her brother, the last of the siblings, in 1938. They lie together with their sister Elizabeth and Isabella’s husband, Duncan Gray, in the lovely churchyard at Rosneath. But sadly for the man who gave Rangers their name his own wasn’t inscribed on the family headstone. This was due to Moses being the last of the family in the area and there wouldn’t have been anyone around to add his name to the stone. The late,great Sandy Jardine was a great supporter of the Founders project. We knew that Sandy had been working on having a plaque with Moses name on it placed at the churchyard at Rosneath.On Sunday 28th June 2015 as part of the Rangers Graves Restoration Project a plaque bearing the name of Moses McNeil was unveiled at Rosneath Cemtery at a dedication ceremony conducted by Parish Minister Christine Murdoch. A memorial is now in place for a lad who fought so hard to establish the Rangers during those turbulent early years. image upload image upload Moses McNeil packed a bag in 1871, left Rosneath, and headed to industrial Glasgow seeking employment.What he actually did was help form a football club that was to become the world’s most successful and would affect the lives of millions worldwide for generations to come….that continues to this day. Today we remember Moses McNeil.
    4 points
  4. Maybe we're becoming spoiled by some recent performances but I didn't think we were too bad tonight The first half was all broken play and frustrating but the second half showed that greatest of sporting qualities - resilience - and we left the field with another European scalp. We've come a long long way in the last two years.
    3 points
  5. This however is not a good thing as any points won by Rangers or Celtic now get divided by 5 instead of 4 , given the 3 other teams will by and large contribute next to nothing going forward it only makes it harder to stay in the top 12 positions .Again the MSM miss the point as the show their usual ignorance towards the whole coefficient issue .
    3 points
  6. Absolutely delighted we won tonight against a team I thought turned out to be a lot better than we expected them to be.
    2 points
  7. This is actually very unfair and a poor comparison , as Ally didnt get to play anywhere near as many group games and the knockout rounds were much more difficult back in his day
    2 points
  8. Another small point , this Poznan team had 19 shots on target against Benfica , albeit they were at home , tonight they had 1 .
    2 points
  9. Lost count of the number of times I shouted that tonight. Then Kent did hit it and I was like FFS. Frustrating night really but wins a win
    2 points
  10. Does beheading fall into the catalogue of hate crimes? Or does it sit alongside 4 decades of turning a blind eye to child abuse you knew was going on at your football club .......... something to perpetrate with impunity
    2 points
  11. Or, perhaps not. An interesting look at the limitations on the speed of fast bowling, from Atherton in today's Times. CRICKET | MIKE ATHERTON Why fast bowlers have already hit their speed limit Mike Atherton , Chief Cricket Correspondent Wednesday October 28 2020, 5.00pm, The Times https://www.thetimes.co.uk/edition/sport/why-crickets-fast-bowlers-have-hit-maximum-speed-fz6vrp6qv The cadaver lab in the American Sports Medicine Institute at the University of Alabama must have been a strange place to work. All those shoulders and elbows from dead bodies being stretched to their limit, tendons and ligaments eventually snapping under the strain, and providing beyond-the-grave research implications for injury prevention to baseball pitchers. As the director of research at ASMI, the understanding, prevention and treatment of elbow injures for pitchers who are pushing the boundaries of the possible has been a constant fascination for Glenn Fleisig. His work has helped to broaden understanding of the damage to the ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) in the elbow joint, where strain is greatest and where injuries commonly occur, after repetitive throwing of fast balls. A pitcher called Tommy John was the first to be operated on in this area in 1974 — his name is now given to the surgical procedure that repairs the damage — and although the treatment of elbow (and shoulder) injuries has improved since then, their frequency has continued to rise as the average speed of pitchers, and the frequency of fast balls, has increased over the years. Average speed, that is, not top speed. Since Aroldis Chapman pitched at record-breaking speed for the Cincinnati Reds ten years ago, only one other man, Jordan Hicks, has reached the 105mph mark. Mind you, plenty more are pitching at three figures: that number almost doubled in the decade since the PITCHf/x system was introduced in Major League Baseball to standardise the measurement of speed. More players are pitching at near top speed, even though that top speed is not increasing. Fleisig’s research suggests why: unlike muscles, tendons and ligaments cannot be strengthened indefinitely. At some point, the wear and tear and the strain becomes too great, and they snap. It means, in all likelihood, that the upper reaches of velocity for baseball pitchers has been reached. “With better mechanics, more pitchers will be towards that top, but the top has topped out,” Fleisig was quoted as saying some years ago. Nothing that has happened since has disproved his theory. Trends in sport are for continual improvement, but not every record is broken. Jonathan Edwards’s triple-jump record has stood for a quarter of a century, Mike Powell’s longest long jump longer still. The great Triple Crown-winning horse, Secretariat, set times in 1973 that have not been bettered since. Modern does not always equate to faster, stronger, higher. Instinct and research suggests a similar plateau for fast bowling in cricket. There may be a greater number of quicker bowlers operating at present — indeed the evidence of modern cricket suggests a far greater homogeneity of bowling speeds because of covered pitches and a homogenisation of conditions — but the fastest are probably not appreciably quicker than the fastest bowlers of previous generations. Training, nutrition and technique may allow bowlers to maintain top speed for longer, and the average speed in Test cricket has been on an upward trajectory, but in all probability, the quickest of the past — Frank Tyson, Jeff Thomson, Michael Holding et al — stand comparison still. “Typhoon”, “Thommo” and “Whispering Death” would still shake batsmen up. Last week, Anrich Nortje, the South Africa speedster, recorded the fastest ball (97.1mph) at the Indian Premier League since its inception over a decade ago, beating the previous fastest in the competition set by Dale Steyn at 95.9mph. While hoopla around anything in the IPL is guaranteed, my own reaction was more muted: four-over spells only — tailor-made, therefore, for short, sharp spells — and a bowler in a T20 tournament still cannot surpass the quickest ball in cricket, recorded 17 years earlier? It was at Cape Town in the World Cup of 2003 that Shoaib Akhtar of Pakistan became the first bowler to be clocked at over 100mph. The ball itself was a little underwhelming — nonchalantly clipped by Nick Knight off his hip — but Shoaib is still one of only three bowlers to have topped that mark on the speed gun, Brett Lee and Shaun Tait, the Australia pair, being the others. All three are among the four quickest bowlers I have seen (or not seen), Allan Donald being the other. Anything around 95mph is really quick, the kind of speed where a batsman has four tenths of a second to make up his mind and play his shot. (Top-class batsmen become trained to pick up cues to give themselves more of a chance, and learn to play the ball without seeing it all the way on to the bat). What feels quick to a batsman may not equate to the speed gun anyway, some bowlers being harder to pick up by nature of their actions. As well as those mentioned, present bowlers such as Jofra Archer, Mark Wood, and Mitchell Starc are all there or thereabouts, as was Mitchell Johnson in the 2013-14 Ashes. But then, so were a handful of those of yesteryear. Grainy footage suggests Harold Larwood was really quick. Those who saw Tyson at the time thought it not possible to bowl more quickly, a similar reaction to those who witnessed Thomson, who was clocked at a fraction under 100mph at the Waca, in Perth. While the benefits of professionalism suggest improvement in speeds would be logical, there are also elements of the modern game that would run counter to that — not least the amount of cricket played and the desire for quick bowlers (like everyone else) to maximise earnings by playing as long as possible. The greater financial rewards now on offer in the professional game discourage bowlers from flinging themselves into the fray at speeds that will damage their bodies. Wood’s fragility is a case in point, something he spoke about at length this week. He can bowl as rapidly as anyone today, but his body struggles to cope for any sustained length of time. Financial rewards encourage stars to glow at lower intensity rather than burning themselves out, as Tyson did. It is not altogether certain that modern training methods have resulted in fitter bowlers in any case, as Larwood’s biography suggests. He enjoyed a level of natural fitness absent in today’s more sedentary age. From a young age, Larwood walked everywhere: six miles to the pit and back when he started work there and then five miles to the railway station every day when Nottinghamshire came calling. Does gym work beat that naturally instilled strength and fitness? I don’t know. After his rapid ball at the IPL last week — which, incidentally, Jos Buttler scooped over short fine leg for four runs — Nortje was asked about breaking Shoaib’s record in due course. “Hopefully it’s something I’ve got in me — it’s definitely something I’ve wanted to do. “Maybe a good wicket, some adrenaline, the right combination and I can do it,” he said. Don’t hold your breath.
    2 points
  12. It's your civic duty, as the Stasi would say.
    2 points
  13. There has been minimal fanfare preceding this fixture, which is a tad surprising but also understandable. I think most of us are expecting a win but games in Europe are rarely easy, so let's not take anything for granted. From what I've read, Lech Poznan might pose a different threat than we usually see, playing a high press and being fairly erratic in terms of outcome (if their gameplan works, it's great but if it doesn't, they tend to look amateurish). I'm hoping to see Roofe and Itten get some game time, a victory and no injuries.
    2 points
  14. You mean like the backlog of fixtures faced by Scotland's representative in the Europa league cup final in 2008? Now what would happen if some clubs could not accommodate the exigencies of league re-scheduling because they, say St. Mirren or Alloa, had previously booked a tour of Japan for their club? There again, I could ask you if you can see the buttons on the back of my head.
    2 points
  15. Celtic have lost more goals this week than we have lost all season , just saying.
    1 point
  16. They had 9 shots on target against Benfica and 0 tonight
    1 point
  17. Yeh I don’t like this stat. Most his games were against champions. He didn’t have the benefit of an annual gimme in Gibraltar.
    1 point
  18. We wanted better after half-time and I think we got it. Yes, it was still scrappy in good positions with one or two touches too many but Morelos came on at the right time and one bit of magic from Barisic wins us the game. After that we sat a bit deeper, managed the game fairly well - other than one or two bad touches after we won it back - but we looked comfortable enough to credit to the defence for yet another clean sheet. It's getting a wee bit tricky for the manager now: does he rotate and make 3-5 changes for every game or does he risk asking too much of some players to maintain continuity? That's a headache for another day, let's enjoy another good win tonight ahead of the next very tough match!
    1 point
  19. 3 points, clean sheet, Alfie on target, no shots on target from them. 1st half was poor, 2nd half was better once Alfie was brought on. On to another huge game on Sunday.
    1 point
  20. Really good result. 3 points was all that mattered and a number of players have been kept fresh for a huge game at Rugby Park on Sunday.
    1 point
  21. On the bright side. Defence holding up as we've come to expect this season. Shots on target :: 0!
    1 point
  22. Awaits an appearance by Comical ASIL to claim it's all the fault of the Jews/Mossad/Tories/Capitalism/Bankers in fact anyone and everyone apart from Corbyn and his fellow anti-semites. I think he's busy organising the crowdfunding for comrade Corbyn.
    1 point
  23. 1 point
  24. 1 point
  25. I may be in the minority but I don't think it's been a good start here - need to up the tempo and quality
    1 point
  26. Brilliant from Roofe. Hagi could have done better.
    1 point
  27. Lille missed a pen. I am told.
    1 point
  28. You are trying to confuse me, now; and succeeding. However, as I often (have to) do, I will simplify. Think of it as Occam's Malky..... The late Glaswegian folksinger, raconteur, writer, drinker, and "character", Mr Matt McGinn, some years ago, was moved to observe: "There was a gay chap* from Khartoum Took a lesbian up into his room But they argued all the night About who had the right To do what, and with which, and to whom." (*He didn't use the expression 'gay chap'.)
    1 point
  29. The world's gone stark raving mad
    1 point
  30. Anyone who isn't a white, heterosexual male.
    1 point
  31. It's an easy mistake to make (just ask @compo 😃).
    1 point
  32. They’re a hard team to judge from a look at their results. Had a look at their transfers and it looks to me like they’ve sold a few good players and, judging by their results, their replacements either aren’t up to it or haven’t settled yet. Last season their record was nearly identical to Legia who were a very tough nut to crack. But their record away in Europe has been very good. A 3-0 win in Sweden is impressive, and a 2-1 away win over a team ahead of Standard Liege in the league is impressive too. I think we will be too organised for them, but it will probably be a close game.
    1 point
  33. Win impact rating is a combination of loads of stats, defensive and offensive. Not sure how much I trust it personally, seems to favour attacking players who take a lot of a shots a bit too much. Interesting reading anyway. Not including our front 3, Arfield, Jack and Tavernier all showing up with very high numbers. I’d think Barisic should be here though.
    1 point
  34. A very low xG for a home game for us, shows how much we took our foot off the gas after getting early goals.
    1 point
  35. Just as well Mel Gibson never screamed, "Freedom...of speech!", when he was getting hung, drawn and quartered.
    1 point
  36. We have nowt to do with the current one which Ashley has his paws into.
    1 point
  37. Where's the other official shop?
    1 point
  38. Let's keep all content in this thread for Thursday's big game. In terms of a preview, there's a bonus Gersnet Podcast tonight at 8pm on our YouTube channel where @Govan Rear Bear and @rfb1872 discuss events surrounding the game.
    1 point
  39. 1 point
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