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  1. did you know that when jim baxter had his trial for raith rovers it was against the rangers .
  2. Thought it might be a good idea to start a thread where we actually list who owns what as disclosed to the LSE , or at least those over 1% . River& Mercantile- 5.77% ,http://www.londonstockexchange.com/exchange/news/market-news/market-news-detail/12205385.html Kieran Prior- 1.35% ,http://www.londonstockexchange.com/exchange/news/market-news/market-news-detail/12205407.html Dave King - 14.75% ,http://www.londonstockexchange.com/exchange/news/market-news/market-news-detail/12202893.html (Not including possible rumoured further purchase from R&M ). George Leatham -4.05% , http://www.londonstockexchange.com/exchange/news/market-news/market-news-detail/12202893.html George Taylor -9.3%, http://www.londonstockexchange.com/exchange/news/market-news/market-news-detail/12202187.html Douglas Park?-6.14%, http://www.londonstockexchange.com/exchange/news/market-news/market-news-detail/12201386.html BNP Parabis - 5% ,http://www.londonstockexchange.com/exchange/news/market-news/market-news-detail/12107289.html Richard Hughes -3% ,http://www.londonstockexchange.com/exchange/news/market-news/market-news-detail/11834364.html Mike Ashley ,8.92%,http://www.londonstockexchange.com/exchange/news/market-news/market-news-detail/12104057.html Sandy Easdale, 5.21% total inc proxies 26.15%,http://www.londonstockexchange.com/exchange/news/market-news/market-news-detail/12093157.html Please feel free to add when the rest are released
  3. http://www.heraldscotland.com/sport/football/king-maps-out-plan-for-the-future.117959899 The suspicion is that if the existing directors are unable to muster the votes required to hold on to power by conventional means they will attempt to do so unconventionally. The savage personal attack on King contained in the statement to the AIM Stock Exchange on Friday underlined what many had long suspected; the power battle at Rangers is going to be a dirty one. Nevertheless, King and his associates are already looking further ahead and formulating plans which they believe will enable the Glasgow club to return to the forefront of Scottish football if they do take control. Appointing a permanent replacement for Ally McCoist by bringing in a manager who can rebuild the side and secure on-field success is at the top of their list of priorities. Luring Rangers stalwarts back into the club to work behind-the-scenes in a variety of roles is also seen as important so the identity of the institution can be restored. The fact no fewer than 12 members of the first team squad are out of contract in the summer is seen as an opportunity to substantially reduce a crippling wage bill that Charles Green, Brian Stockbridge and Craig Mather are largely to blame for. "There is obviously an opportunity to have contracts terminated," said King. "We have to make some fairly significant changes to the footballing side. But before that it is critical that we get the right manager in because we are bringing a manager into a team that is obviously not equipped to compete in the Premier League and is really struggling. "You would have thought that when Rangers were demoted they would have fairly comfortably come through the lower leagues into the Premiership and then maybe struggled for a season or two. "But right now we are struggling to get out of the Championship. Given the need to balance budgets and just be more sensible about the way the money is spent, we are going to have to get a manager who has the capacity to identify and manage players. "So I would imagine that the single most important decision will be identifying the right manager, who has all of these qualities. It really is someone who is more of a coach." King revealed he would be willing to pay compensation to another club for their manager if the best candidate they identify is in employment. He said: "If it was within reason, then paying compensation would be considered. I think everyone would accept that Rangers have to completely rebuild the squad. So the manager's role is so critical. "One wouldn't easily take the second choice when a little bit of money would have got you your first choice. I think we have just got to get it right. There's too much money being spent around it that is key to that individual to not get that appointment right." McCoist is currently on gardening leave while he serves out his 12-month notice period and could theoretically return in some capacity if King, Paul Murray and John Gilligan are appointed directors. But King said: "My understanding is that Ally has expressed no interest in coming back even with regime change. The indications I've had from those who have spoken to him more recently than I have is that he thinks he is done and he really doesn't see himself as part of the future." John Greig, Sandy Jardine and Walter Smith have all worked behind the scenes at Ibrox in a number of different roles in recent years and King would like to see a return to the days when Rangers men were involved in the running of the club. Greig declined to take to the pitch along with the other members of the European Cup-Winners' Cup winning team when the Govan Stand was renamed in honour of his former team-mate Jardine back in August. King said: "For me personally somebody like John Greig would be very important. I spoke to John when I was over here in November - just phoned him up and asked him how he was doing. "There are individuals who are not welcome - because they are not supportive of the existing regime. But what we would like to do is connect with the past. "Despite the difficult times, the history hasn't been lost. We already have Richard Gough showing support and to have people like John Grieg and Graeme Souness is going to be very, very important." The Glasgow-born financier, who once ploughed £20 million of his personal fortune into his boyhood heroes, is hopeful there will be no nasty surprises lurking in the books if he does take over. He said: "I think the circumstances of the club are such that there is a limit to how bad it can be. I can't imagine there will be a huge amount of creditors building up. I can't imagine that anyone has been lending money that we don't know about. "The stadium we know hasn't been used as security. "So while I think there will be some surprises, I think they might run into a couple of million, I don't think we are going to find a hole of £15 million to £20 million."
  4. According to Ronnie Esplin on Twitter, Kenny McDowall says he has been told to play 5 loan players. Wow!
  5. We asked the question last night about how much is being paid for the loan players from NUFC It turns out Rangers don't even know as Ashley hasn't decided yet. Must be the first club ever to sign five players without first agreeing how much they will cost. Discussion took place today and most likely outcome will be dependant on how many games they play. Wonder how they got that past the two Football Associations. Contacts claim the players were hawked around England first with no takers hence the reason we got them with half an hour to go in transfer window.
  6. #Rangers under-20 side to face Hearts: Robinson, Sinnamon, Zaliukas, Halkett, Mills, Murdoch, Crawford, Gallagher, Hardie, Walsh, Templeton. #Rangers subs for the Development League match against Hearts: Kelly, Roberts, Pascazio, Whiteside, Ramsay, Ogen, Gibson.
  7. Another record for Deadline Day? Five players to boost the squad, are you a happy Bear?
  8. Hi chaps and chapesses. Didn't get to see the game on Sunday due to TV not showing it here but after being out of touch for a long time how far away are we from the supposed measuring stick? TBH a 2-0 defeat is more than I would have expected. What is more gutting is that they are certainly no great shakes and if we had been managed rightly on our so called journey we could and should have won this and been a match for them. As such, anyone who was there can let me know far behind are we? And if we get promotion via the plays off this season where are we on par with the other sides.
  9. Former Italy midfielder Rino Gattuso wants to be Rangers manager one day. Current Rangers team boss Kenny McDowall is working his 12-month notice having handed in his resignation. And 37-year-old Gattuso, who spent a season with Rangers as a player, this month applied unsuccessfully for the vacancy at Hamilton Academical. "My dream is to maybe one day to have the chance to work for this club," he said after attending a tribute match for former defender Fernando Ricksen. "I played today, but manager is a different job. I am sure 100% that this is a big club." Gattuso did not wish to comment on his application to manage Accies after Alex Neil's switch to Norwich City. Hamilton last week appointed former captain Martin Canning as player-manager and insisted that they had already decided they wanted the defender to succeed Neil before they received expressions of interest from the Italian among others. After yesterdays game I would love this to happen! even in a charity game he had more fight in his little toe than our team all season!!! he would shake the team up and get the journey men working for their over inflated wage packet........
  10. Strapped in for yet another transfer window? Well, here we go! Graeme Shinnie (Left-back, 23, Inverness Caledonian Thistle) Max Power (attacking midfielder, 21, Tranmere Rovers) Express Graeme Shinnie on wiki
  11. Not much yet, but here we go ... Rest later or from behind the pay wall of The Sun
  12. The Rangers Supporters Trust (RST) is delighted to announce that, following a successful meeting yesterday, the Rangers Fans Fighting Fund (RFFF) has thrown its considerable finances and influence behind the RST's continuing fight to ensure Ibrox remains under the control of the club. We are delighted that the RFFF has taken this decision and would like to thank them for doing so. There is now a substantial legal fund available, should it be required, to fight any attempt by this board to pass security over Ibrox to Mike Ashley. We will work closely with the RFFF going forward to ensure every avenue is explored. http://www.therst.co.uk/news/rst-gains-rfff-support-for-ibrox-legal-fight/
  13. We're spending another season in the Championship. No doubt about it.
  14. Stuart McCall has thrown his support behind the Three Bears, the group owning a near 19 per cent stake in Rangers headed by businessman and Rangers fan Douglas Park. The former Ibrox midfielder has called for Rangers people to be back at the helm of the stricken ship, believing that the departure of legendary figures have left a gaping hole at the heart of the club. “I don’t know any of these gentlemen [the Three Bears], but if you believe what you read, they have Rangers at heart,” said McCall yesterday “I’m not saying that, just because you have Rangers at heart, you are going to be successful and the club is going to make money. But you do know that, whatever they are doing, they are doing it for the right reasons. “They are not in there saying: ‘we can earn this and we can get out’. What you want are people that the club matters to and will do their best for the club, not for themselves as individuals. If it is The Three Bears, if it is Dave King, if it is anyone else, you would rather have people who bother about the club and it’s not just about money-making. “Rangers don’t necessarily need an ex-player as their manager,” he added. “But what they need is someone at the club who doesn’t just have business sense, but is actually doing it for the love of the club – because they’ve got ties to the club.” McCall believes that the departure of three stalwarts who have cut their ties with Rangers – John Greig, Ally McCoist and Walter Smith – sums up the state of the Ibrox club. The Scotland coach was at Ibrox for the abandoned game against Hearts on Friday night in his role as a summariser for BT Sport and watched with anguish afterwards as passions ran high among supporters angered by the board’s conduct. With advanced notices of loan securities against Ibrox and Murray Park having been lodged at the Register of Scotland last week in the name of Mike Ashley’s Sports Direct retail company, fans now fear losing ownership of the club’s stadium. However, it is the emotional heart of the club being ripped out that McCall struggles to accept. Greig, voted Greatest Ever Ranger in 1999, resigned as a director in 2011 in protest at Craig Whyte’s running of the club. Departed manager McCoist, who was put on gardening leave after tendering his resignation, has decided to watch other teams rather than Rangers in recent weeks. Nine-in-a-row manager Smith, meanwhile, confirmed last week he has no intention of ever returning to Ibrox in an official capacity. McCall, who played for Rangers for seven years and had been linked with a return as manager, despairs at the quality of characters who have felt compelled to end their official association with the club. The 50-year-old offered the assessment that few clubs, including Manchester United, could withstand such blows without some very searching question being asked. “John Greig stayed away, which for me is hard to get my head round,” said McCall. “Walter left the board and, again, alarm bells started ringing. If Walter is walking away it must be bad. Obviously the great Sandy Jardine passed away. And now ’Coisty is away. That would be like Bobby Charlton at Man United saying: “You know what? I’ve had enough of the club. Then Sir Alex Ferguson departing because something was going on – and then Ryan Giggs leaving. If that happened at Man United, imagine how everyone would react. “Yes, football is a business now. But is there anybody at Rangers actually doing it for the sake of the club? Or are they just in to make a few quid then disappear into the night?” McCall was speaking at a Scottish Football Association event to publicise the start of the selection process for year four of the regional performance school programme. Since resigning as Motherwell manager late last year the Scotland coach has been linked with the Rangers manager’s post, currently occupied on an interim basis by Kenny McDowall. However, he sounded unconvinced by those in charge at boardroom level at the club, and questioned Ashley’s involvement. “Mr Ashley has got what, eight-and-a-half or nine per cent of the club?” McCall said. “Yet he seems to be the one making all the decisions – appointing a chief exec and a finance director etc. Obviously I’ve got a lot of friends and family who are Rangers supporters – and they can’t understand how this can be the case. The catalyst for everything now is the fact that Ibrox was going to be put up as security against loans. Supporters see other people wanting to offer money and ask why Ashley is the best option.” http://www.scotsman.com/sport/football/spfl-lower-divisions/stuart-mccall-backs-three-bears-rangers-bid-1-3665193
  15. chilledbear

    Egm

    EGM requisition has been delivered to Ibrox within the last couple of minutes. Statement klaxon to follow no doubt.
  16. Welcome aboard Captain America and a true Rangers captain in Richard Gough http://www.rangersfirst.org/captain-america-joins-rangersfirst/
  17. THERE was a rare moment of unity between Rangers fans groups and the Scottish Football Association when the governing body blocked Mike Ashley’s proposals to increase his stake in the club last month. Then, a Union of Fans statement spoke of the SFA having “done the right thing” in observing their rules on dual ownership by refusing to approve the Newcastle United owner’s bid to increase his Rangers stake from around 9 per cent to 29 per cent. Yet, those same supporters are unlikely to be so taken by the SFA obeying their articles of association should Dave King succeed in his mission to oust the current board. King revealed his intentions on Friday night when he requisitioned an extraordinary general meeting (egm). The South Africa-based businessman, Rangers’ largest single shareholder with a 16 per cent stake, is “confident” he can muster the 50 per cent shareholder support he needs to remove chairman David Somers, James Easdale, Derek Llambias and Barry Leach from their directorship. His plan is to replace them with himself, Paul Murray and John Gilligan. And therein lies the rub. At an egm, which the current Rangers board could stall for six weeks, King could expect the support of the 20 per cent stake controlled by the Donald Park, George Letham and George Taylor consortium. In addition, he is believed to have the ear of a couple of the hedge funds with a 10 per cent holding between them, while individual supporters whose share totals add up to a further 10 per cent would back his efforts to put the Ibrox club into the hands of supporters. That is all well and good, and Ashley deserves to be removed because of his callous disregard for the club and its followers in this week’s moves to gain security over Ibrox and Murray Park. The current board maintain this was in return for the £10 million loan Rangers need to see out the season. But it is important to look beyond Ashley’s game-playing and not forget how we arrived at this point. In the independent inquiry chaired by Lord Nimmo Smith under the auspices of the SFA, the old board were criticised for failing to blow the whistle on Craig Whyte as he sent the club on the road to ruin after taking over in May 2011. King was a member of that board. And it cannot be forgotten either that the reason King was in no position to buy the assets once the old Rangers had been condemned to liquidation the following summer, and save it from the clutches of Charles Green, was that the Castlemilk-born businessman was then in the midst of a decade-long legal battle with the South African Revenue Service. He settled last year by pleading guilty to 42 criminal counts of contravening the country’s tax laws, and kept himself out of prison by plea bargaining on almost 300 other charges, which required him to stump up £41m. As far as failing to meet the SFA’s fit and proper person test, King – who lost £20m he invested in the David Murray Rangers era – does so with bells on. Indeed, it is almost as if the ruling has been written to debar individuals with chequered business careers of King’s ilk. Under section (h) of Article 10.2 that sets out the “considerations” that would be made concerning the board “reserving its discretion” as to whether a person is deemed fit and proper to hold a football directorship, it is stated “[if] he has been convicted within the last ten years of (i) an offence liable to imprisonment of two years or over, (ii) corruption or (iii) fraud.” King was liable for a stretch longer than two years had he not plea-bargained. Moreover, he is caught in a double bind over the fit and proper person rules. Because what also counts against those seeking to meet the criteria is having “been a director of a club in membership of any National Association within the five-year period preceding such club having undergone an insolvency event”. King and Paul Murray – who was sacked from the Rangers board immediately after Whyte took over – both fall down on this basis. They simply cannot be granted permission by the SFA to take up directorships in any Rangers board if the governing body stands by their own rules, which were tightened up because they had failed to act over Whyte’s dubious business past. King constantly puts it out through sympathetic media sources that he is confident the SFA professional game board would wave him through as a Rangers director in the event of gaining a controlling interest. That sounds like bluster, which, as well as the baggage, has led to legitimate questioning of King’s credentials to lead Rangers out of the mire. At times, though, it must be said he talks a good game. As he did in his statement on Friday in which he claimed that, as well as putting the club on a sound financial footing, a second “important task” would be “to conduct a forensic audit of the management and commercial contracts undertaken over the last few years to determine whether they are truly arm’s length and whether the affairs of the company have been pursued in accordance with the fiduciary obligations of those entrusted with that responsibility”. King thundered at the end of this declaration of intent that “any malfeasance will be pursued aggressively and transparently”. For the South African tax authorities, that might read like a sick joke. http://www.scotsman.com/sport/football/spfl-lower-divisions/rangers-dave-king-s-move-faces-taxing-questions-1-3664643
  18. I was trolling through a few Jambo websites, hoping to pick up a couple of titbits for Friday evening's match preview. There is considerable angst among the talk o' ra toon that Rangers have reciprocated the ticket allocation we received at Tynecastle, ie just under a thousand. I can understand maroon frustrations, they all want to there to witness another skelping of the mighty Rangers and be able to say, "I was there" on the hat-trick of administered punishment. Back in the day, I remember the Hearts support trapping at Ibrox circa 10,000 strong. An early season game at the start of the seventies, attendance of 50,000 and a fifth of those in maroon in ra Sellik end, going deservedly berserk in homage to their fleet-footed winger, Kenny Aird ripping us several new ones, as we crumbled 0-3. The early 80s on an ice bound pitch, the whole Broomloan and part of the Main Stand populated by Hearty Harrys, wholly appreciative as their favourites comfortable defeated Rangers, 0-2. Thus, Hearts have the support, should we accommodate them? The cleverer Jambos are playing the common currency card. We need the dosh, the lights could be out as early as next week, why not allow 5,000 Hearts supporters to ease the very real pain? A cash pay-in gate would have some of our current Board members salivating at the possibility of negotiating the marble stair case with bulging pockets? Would an enhanced crowd of between 35-40,000 improve the atmosphere and inspire the Bears to an unexpected victory? Do we demand continued strict adherence to starving out the Board? It's a conundrum for all Bears and given that a considerable percentage of both broadcast and print media NEVER miss an opportunity to twist the knife, I am surprised, genuinely that the situation has not been fully exploited. What do Gersnetters think? Should the old stadium extend the welcoming hand to the boys in maroon?
  19. Kyle McAusland @kyle_mcausland Sad to say my time at @RangersFC has come to an end. To have played for the club was a dream come true but disappointed on how it has ended.
  20. It’s good to see that HMRC’s latest failing - being unable to furnish costs of their continual and apparently relentless pursuit of Rangers over EBT’s - has galvanised the Rangers support into a long overdue unified sense of purpose. After a period of unhelpful adjectives and metaphors, which military men would aptly describe as “blue on blue”, we are at long last reminding ourselves where the real enemies of our club are, and it’s certainly not from within. It is not surprising that HMRC’s latest hypocritical incompetency, and I use that term deliberately in view of the fact we are talking about an investigative government agency who hold both private individuals and companies accountable for failing to keep meticulous financial records, has given rise amongst some of our fans to suggestions of a grandiose conspiracy. I don’t subscribe to such a conspiracy theory, and those who read this blog regularly will know that as far as I’m concerned “Evidence is king”. There appears to be little or no evidence available at this time to suggest any high level conspiracy, instead I will in the course of this article offer you an alternative evidence based theory to explain why HMRC’s pursuit of our club has all the characteristics of a witch hunt. Before dismissing such a conspiracy theory completely however it is worthwhile pointing out that the South African Tax Authorities have recently discovered what has been described as a rogue unit working within their organisation. Furthermore much closer to home, the families of the Hillsborough victims had to suffer considerable ridicule for suggesting that the Police were involved in some kind of conspiratorial cover up over events that tragic day. Several years later the 160 odd altered Police Statements and deliberate, false and malicious briefing of the press by the Police, are now a matter of public record and the subject of an ongoing enquiry. Therefore despite the absence of evidence of conspiracy perhaps the best course available to us is to at least keep an open mind whilst concentrating on the evidence which is available to us. Discounting such a conspiracy theory does not however also discount the ruthless nature of this enquiry, nor the attempts by HMRC to deliberately mislead the Rangers support during the course of it. It would come as no surprise to any of us if, in the near future evidence was uncovered which demonstrates HMRC have acted in both an unscrupulous, unprofessional and unedifying manner throughout the course of this enquiry. After all, it wouldn’t be the first time. http://blogs.telegraph.co.uk/finance/ianmcowie/100014676/2000-tax-dodgers-confess-but-should-hmrc-have-paid-for-stolen-information/ Some will note the particular irony of HMRC paying for stolen evidence, given the fact a considerable amount of evidence in the Rangers Tax Tribunal, ended up in the possession of BBC Scotland journalists and proved to be the catalyst to “The men who sold the jerseys” documentary. However the Redknapp case was not the only one which had brought the professionalism and competency of HMRC under a very public spotlight, leaving it’s investigators with red faces and questions being asked. https://www.accountancylive.com/cassidy-hmrc-should-eat-humble-pie-over-montpelier-case I doubt there is a Rangers fan out there who doesn’t feel a sense of the tunnel vision Mr Cassidy alludes to during the Montpelier case. It appears history may well be repeating itself as HMRC continue to pursue Rangers despite a number of failed appeals chaired by some of the most qualified tax experts in the country. These spectacular high profile failings and questions of competency, integrity and professionalism served to bring HMRC very much under an intense spotlight, most notably by the public accounts committee. http://www.theguardian.com/politics/2013/oct/28/hmrc-chiefs-mps-lost-tax http://economia.icaew.com/news/november-2014/pac-slams-hmrcs-anti-tax-avoidance-strategy So we have a government investigative agency, with a spectacular series of high profile failures, even despite indulging in some fairly unscrupulous means of obtaining evidence which in itself calls into question the very integrity of the organisation itself, under considerable pressure to re-dress their very public humiliation in a series of failed prosecutions. It certainly puts into some kind of perspective the relentless and ruthless nature of HMRC’s pursuit of Rangers. Quite simply after so many failings they simply had to get a result. But if HMRC were in a bit of a hole prior to and during the investigation, rather than stop digging as the age old saying goes, they appear to have taken the equivalent of a JCB to the situation. Apologies for the following paragraph in advance, as it deals mainly in conjecture rather than facts, but it is worth mentioning all the same. Despite HMRC’s claim to be unable to furnish the cost of the Rangers Tax Case, rumours abound of figures at or around the £10 million mark. Furthermore it is common knowledge that Sir David Murray attempted to settle with HMRC over EBT’s offering anything between 10-12 million pounds. Even taking the lower settlement figure HMRC are now looking not only at £10 million lost revenue, but also perhaps £10 million costs for pursuing a case against a company from whom they will be unable to recoup anything even if they were to eventually be successful in a forthcoming appeal. One wonders what the Public Accounts Committee will make of all this. Moving on from public accounts to public accountability and the HMRC JCB appears to have been working in overdrive to dig a bigger hole for themselves. http://www.dailyrecord.co.uk/sport/football/football-news/ex-rangers-owner-craig-whyte-being-3992415 Perhaps HMRC would care to explain to Rangers shareholders, and any other interested parties for that matter, why they allowed Craig Whyte, who they were already pursuing for a sum of £3.7 million and whom they had threatened with bankruptcy as a result of failed tax returns, to take control of an organisation and run it into the ground by failing to make PAYE payments for nearly 9 months. If you cannot hear the alarm bells by now, then you either are deaf or have your fingers, quite firmly, in your ears. HMRC’s JCB next wrong turn was in the form of a generic reply via correspondence. As thousands of Rangers supporters and shareholders wrote to complain about confidential tax documents and other paperwork appearing in the public domain, HMRC responded by asserting it did not comment or respond to speculation about alleged breaches of confidentiality. “Speculation”? “Alleged”? The subject of those complaints were The Rangers Tax Case Blog and the BBC Documentary “The men who sold the jerseys” both of which went onto win national awards, with the latter being broadcast on national television. Journalist Tom English described the Rangers Tax Case Blog as follows: “If you wanted to know the latest news on their tax travails, rangerstaxcase was a place you went because, unlike newspapers or radio stations, rangerstaxcase was connected to the heart of the FTT and everybody knew it. It had documents and detail that were beyond dispute. When illustrating one point it was making it would summon up information that could only have come from somebody within, or very close to, the tribunal” (The Scotsman 25.11.2012) Why have HMRC deliberately prevaricated and failed to respond to this clear breach of confidential information. How can they justify describing a national television broadcast and an award winning blog, whose plaudits and awards are based around the revealing of confidential information, as mere “speculation”? As others outside the Rangers community have since commented both these outlets of confidential information presented it such a way as to infer the guilt of Rangers FC. Was the same unscrupulous culture within HMRC which saw them buy stolen property in the Redknapp case alive and kicking also in the Rangers Tax Case – a kind of win at all costs mentality? Whilst the source and nature of those confidential leaks has been subject to many theories and discussions, confirmation about one of the sources was provided courtesy of Lord Nimmo Smith, in his SPL Independent Commission Report. "Meanwhile, BBC Scotland came, by unknown means, into possession of what they described as “dozens of secret emails, letters and documents”, which we understand were the productions before the Tax Tribunal. These formed the basis of a programme entitled “Rangers – The Men Who Sold the Jerseys”, which was broadcast on 23 May 2012. BBC Scotland also published copious material on its website. The published material included a table containing the names of Rangers players, coaches and staff who were beneficiaries of the MGMRT, and how much they received through that trust.” (Section 98) Perhaps not so much a case of “Who sold the jerseys” but more of a case of Who sold the evidence? That is of course the evidence, or as Lord Nimmo Smith terms “productions”, which was seized by HMRC during the course of their investigation into Rangers and which was presented before the Tax Tribunal. The question is why the removal of this evidence and its subsequent use in the BBC Scotland documentary aforementioned, was not the subject of a Police enquiry until after the verdict of the tax tribunal, when complaints by both Sir David Murray and myself saw the launching of a criminal enquiry. It raises serious questions about the safe handling and storing of productions, as well as duties and responsibilities of investigative agencies with regard to the loss or theft of productions. In particular it raises questions about how and why Lord Nimmo Smith was able to arrive at such a conclusions with regard to the source of the material which BBC Scotland subsequently came into possession of. http://www.v3.co.uk/v3-uk/news/1996757/cameron-promises-transparent-government It’s time for you to deliver Mr Cameron and the Rangers support will not rest until you do. We want a full government enquiry into this whole process and we will not rest until we get it. We will play to win – and win at all costs.
  21. ...ahead of return to Ibrox for Fernando Ricksen testimonial. MARCO Negri's time at Rangers was plagued with mystery and controversy. The Italian striker opens up on what will be an emotional return to Glasgow later this month as he gets set to play in Fernando Ricksen's testimonial match. MARCO NEGRI was an enigma. An international man of mystery who came to these shores burning as brightly as a Roman candle before fizzling out just as quickly. It was 1997 and Negri was the £3.5million worth of Italian striking talent bought by Walter Smith to fire Rangers to the Holy Grail of 10 in a row. For five months the long-haired Negri scored goals as if they were going out of fashion. Five against Dundee United, four against Dunfermline, three against Kilmarnock – 30 goals plundered before ’97 turned to ’98. Then, in the blink of an eye, it was over. A game of squash with team-mate Sergio Porrini ended in horrific injury and everything changed. Negri suffered a detached retina after being smacked in the eye with the squash ball and when he came back he wasn’t the same player. He scored only three more goals for Rangers and when Smith left, to be replaced by Dick Advocaat, Negri played just three games in two seasons until he was loaned and finally sold back to Italy. In all that time he hardly uttered a word in public. He made Howard Hughes look like Harry Redknapp. So when Negri picks up his phone in Bologna and speaks with enthusiasm and exuberance, in perfect English, about his time in Glasgow the listener is a little taken aback. Now 44, he hasn’t returned to Glasgow since leaving in November 2001 but that will change when Negri pulls on a Rangers jersey again in the testimonial match that has been arranged for the benefit of Motor Neuron Disease victim Fernando Ricksen at Ibrox on Sunday, January 25. The fact he was willing to drop everything and come to the aid of his stricken former team-mate is an indication there was far more to Negri than the public perception. But he believes the reputation he got for being mean and moody stemmed from the day that earmarked him as something special – a 5-1 demolition of Dundee United a month after joining Rangers. He said: “People saying I was unhappy came from what I call my perfect game – the day I scored five goals against Dundee United. “But before that game there was an incident with a member of the Rangers staff that I was very unhappy about. I can’t say any more than that but I was not happy going out on to the pitch. “If you look at the goals I scored against Kilmarnock or Celtic or anybody else you will see me laughing and smiling. “But everyone just looks at the Dundee United match and they think I should be over the moon because I scored five goals – but I was upset before that game.” He doesn’t say any more because he is keeping the juicy stuff for a book he has coming out in Scotland in April about his controversial life and times. But he does admit he is excited at the prospect of returning to Ibrox, although he wishes the circumstances were happier. He added: “I have to be honest and say there are many emotions. Of course it will be wonderful to play in front of the Rangers fans again. It’s a long time since I’ve played and I don’t want to let myself down. “But on the other side is the reason for the match – we are doing something for a team-mate who has a terrible illness and is putting up such a brave fight. “Fernando is struggling and we will do what we can to help. I am bringing my 10-year-old-son Christian to Glasgow for the first time and it will be a chance for him to watch me playing with the blue jersey. “I am already a little under pressure because he is telling me I have to score a goal! “A lot of feelings I have will be unlocked when I come to Glasgow. We are coming over for a few days and I want to show my son the city and the stadium. “We will act as tourists and of course there is the game and I am doing a question and answer session for Fernando’s charity.” Ask if he regrets the manner in which his Rangers career ended and his answer is instant. “Of course,” he said. “I have regrets that my story with Rangers is not complete. “I know my time there was seen by others as being mysterious and controversial. I am bringing out a book in April and those issues will be dealt with at that time but there were injuries and many misunderstandings. And of course there was a squash ball...” The physical pain may have long gone but 17 years on the emotional scars remain. He said: “For me, my career ended the day I was hit in the eye with that squash ball on the fifth of January. “I tried to come back. Rangers were struggling a little bit as they tried to win 10 in a row and the pressure was huge for everyone. I had to rest for two months because the pressure on my eye was very high. I couldn’t train properly, I couldn’t do anything. “I was a striker, a penalty box player, and my game was all about sharpness. “That’s why I played squash – it helped my footwork and movement. “But although I got playing again it wasn’t the same. The eye wasn’t right but I wanted to play my part. “Absolutely, I regret it. It started so well. I was winning the race for the European Golden Boot and waiting for a call-up to the Italy squad ahead of the World Cup in France. “I was on top of the world and then something terrible happened. “As a player you can expect to injure your knee or your ankle or something. But believe me, I did not expect to go to a squash court with Sergio Porrini on my day off and come back without a retina in my eye. “It was terrible luck and although I am relaxed about speaking about it now, at the time it was so hard to live with.” Negri is happy now, though. And after the Ricksen match he is looking forward to representing Rangers in Australia at a summer coaching school. He said: “I’ve been doing soccer camps with a big society in Milan with players like Fabio Cannavaro, Massimo Ambrosini and Alessandro Costacurta. “Last season I did it in Portland in the USA and the year before in Seattle. “This June I am going to Darwin in Australia with Rangers to become involved in some soccer schools being run by the club. That will help me give something back to the club. “I was contacted by Andrew Power, a Rangers fan, who runs the biggest soccer school in Australia. He saw what I had done for the Milan Society in the USA and Italy and asked if I’d be interested. I said yes immediately.” Doesn’t sound much like Moody Marco, does he? Maybe in reality he never was. http://www.dailyrecord.co.uk/sport/football/rangers-legend-marco-negri-opens-4952619?
  22. “We have to keep believing because leads like Hearts’ have been blown before.” Dean I hope you do let us see what you can really do because up until now it is disappointing.
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