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Mohsni - The SFA have made an example out of me


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BH,the laws of the game are all subject to interpretation.

To do this properly,you need to be impartial.

IMPARTIAL.....even handed,fair,just,objective,open minded,unbiased,unprejudiced.

When the subject is Bilel mohsni,you sir are NONE of these things.

Taking this into consideration,I would suggest your opinions are worthless.

 

A lot of what you say is true, LB.

 

Despite the guidance from FIFA, ultimately what constitutes violent conduct is a matter for the referee's judgement; but the guidance of "excessive force" and "brutality" is there to assist a referee in making that judgement.

 

Let me put this another way. Let's say that Mohsni refuses to shake hands, Erwin pushes him in the back but with sufficient force to knock him down, Mohsni takes it in his stride and walks off the park. What action would or should the referee have taken then? Most likely nothing in my opinion, other than perhaps a suggestion in the player's ear that the game is over and get up the f**** up the tunnel as quickly as possible. Possibly a yellow card for unsporting behaviour, which is the SFA view. Had Mohsni not retaliated none of this would be under discussion.

 

I agree that I am far from unbiased where Mr Bilel Mohsni is concerned but I have tried to give an opinion from a refereeing perspective of what the Laws of the Game have to say on this subject based on my experience as a referee and administrator in the game; but I have also said that ultimately "violent conduct" is a judgement call for each referee, whom absent the SFA. They made the call and I agree with their decision.

 

On last thing, I was a Rangers fan when I was a referee. Most if not all referees are fans of one team or another. That does not make their decisions invalid even where they are for or against "their" team. As a referee or linesman you simply do not have time to think will I give this decison for or against "my" team. You only have a split second to make a decision, whether it be a foul, throw in or whatever. This is hard enough without factoring in bias. I know that's not really your point; but I thouught I'd add it nonetheless.

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I totally disagree that an unexpected push in the back cannot cause injury. There is a danger of whiplash and at an extreme you could break your neck. You could also fall awkwardly opening up the possibility of a number of injuries.

 

I am not medically qualified, Pete, so cannot argue with your opinion; but I still doubt that many refrees would have viewed that push as violent conduct, within the meaning of the Las of the Game.

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I was a lot less critical of Mosher as a player than most on here but what he did at the end of the game is indefensible and thank God no other Rangers player got involved.

 

Pete, can you refer me to any medical journal with an article or case study of whiplash injury suffered by big fit blokes from a wee push in the back? Or worse still a broken neck?

 

As for Erwin, his conduct was not in normal circumstances reprehensible but as the Youngs, Spences and Englishes of this world keep pontificating, players have to be aware of the situation and behave accordingly.

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I was a lot less critical of Mosher as a player than most on here but what he did at the end of the game is indefensible and thank God no other Rangers player got involved.

 

Pete, can you refer me to any medical journal with an article or case study of whiplash injury suffered by big fit blokes from a wee push in the back? Or worse still a broken neck?

 

 

The common whiplash symptoms

 

2013 Update:

If you believe you are suffering from whiplash, and would like to quickly determine the most common symptoms, please jump to our list of 12 simple questions under the ‘Have I Got Whiplash?’ section below.

 

 

 

Whiplash is a type of neck injury that occurs when the neck is forced away from the body and then pulled back towards it. This motion is usually the result of either the body or the head being subjected to a sudden force, and causes the neck to move like the lash of a whip, hence the term ‘whiplash’.

 

Whiplash is a common injury to sustain in:

 

Car accidents

Falls (especially from horses and bikes)

Contact sports such as football, rugby, boxing and martial arts

Slips

Fights and physical attacks.

 

Many people mistakenly assume that whiplash can only occur if the head or body is struck with a lot of force or at high speed. This is not true. Being pushed in the back could just as easily cause whiplash as being involved in a rear-end shunt in your car.

Sustaining a Whiplash Injury

 

To illustrate what happens when a whiplash injury occurs, we’ll use the most common cause of whiplash – a car accident. Imagine that you are driving a car in a normal seated position, when – bang! – you are struck from behind by another car.

 

When the car behind makes contact, force travels forward through your car. Usually, at the time of impact, the force will either drive your body forward leaving your head and neck stationary, or will drive your neck and head forward and leave your body behind. This causes your neck to extend away from your body.

 

As your neck extends in one direction, the tendons, ligaments and muscles inside stretch further than their normal range, and tearing occurs. Your body’s natural defence mechanism then causes your neck muscles to contract so that they pull the neck back towards the body as fast as possible. This retraction can be as sudden and violent as the initial impact, and can also cause soft tissue damage.

 

Depending on how severe the damage to your neck is, you may be aware of the injury immediately or you may not know you are hurt until hours later. In many cases, it is not until the next day that the painful symptoms of whiplash become apparent.

 

As for Erwin, his conduct was not in normal circumstances reprehensible but as the Youngs, Spences and Englishes of this world keep pontificating, players have to be aware of the situation and behave accordingly.

 

It is here in this claims website. I learned of it as I have studied for health and safety. Pulling a chair away from somebody is used as a joke and normally is but if it goes wrong it can put a person in a wheelchair. We do not always realise the consequences of our actions.

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McCoist should never have signed him in the first place, but that has nothing to do with the topic.

 

Bilel Mohsni looked a good player when he played a couple of friendlies for us, we were desperate for him to sign on the dotted line after just two trial games. After we secured him It didn't take long to find he was just another distractor like many others in these past 3 years.

 

I think it didn't help when he engaged with the opposition fans and played it for the camera when the occasion cried out for more important business to be taken care of on the field...gradually the Rangers fans got sick of this as his concentration levels resulted in costly blunders with dire consequences for results, it also affected others in the team especially the young up and coming youths. What a mess!

 

Moshni was severely punished for his 'behaviour' at the end of the Motherwell game, the way I see it is he was rightly punished for his contribution as a representative of RFC.

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Mucho gracias, estimado senor.

 

Mucho gracias makes no sense. Gracias is 'feminine' and plural so it has to be 'muchas gracias'. I just thought a grammatical 'snob' would want to know that!

Edited by Anchorman
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McCoist should never have signed him in the first place, but that has nothing to do with the topic.

 

Bilel Mohsni looked a good player when he played a couple of friendlies for us, we were desperate for him to sign on the dotted line after just two trial games. After we secured him It didn't take long to find he was just another distractor like many others in these past 3 years.

 

I think it didn't help when he engaged with the opposition fans and played it for the camera when the occasion cried out for more important business to be taken care of on the field...gradually the Rangers fans got sick of this as his concentration levels resulted in costly blunders with dire consequences for results, it also affected others in the team especially the young up and coming youths. What a mess!

 

Moshni was severely punished for his 'behaviour' at the end of the Motherwell game, the way I see it is he was rightly punished for his contribution as a representative of RFC.

 

Good post Bearman, which i agree with, but Moshni was still deemed good enough for selection against Motherwell. In my mind then the club and especially the manager owed him a least a care. But instead they washed their hands of him. Moshni also has to take responsibility for his actions and blaming McCall is wrong to, but he was made an easy scapegoat for everyone.

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