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Scott Brown - would he get a game for Juve, Real, Barce or similar? Or even Bolton Wanderers?

 

It was also a reply to SBS's post #187, in which he said " It does my head in when I see Scottish players out drinking.", and with which Rousseau agreed.

It was indeed said, tongue in cheek.

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On the plus side, the photo of the players out drinking on Saturday only shows a few of our players, so it's not necessarily as if the full squad was out getting hammered. :D

 

The rest of the squad was at an AA meeting :D.

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The rest of the squad was at an AA meeting :D.

 

Lol, good shout! :D

 

Seriously though, I don't even see an issue. I'm pretty sure that Mark Warburton won't tolerate any players taking the piss and turning up at Murray Park late or hungover like PLG allegedly had to deal with. The players will be well aware of that too.

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Lol, good shout! :D

 

Seriously though, I don't even see an issue. I'm pretty sure that Mark Warburton won't tolerate any players taking the piss and turning up at Murray Park late or hungover like PLG allegedly had to deal with. The players will be well aware of that too.

 

Did I not read that Warburton asked the players to make the rules for conduct? I

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Admittedly, I hadn't thought it was beneficial, but on your claims I did a quick search. It turns out there are a few health benefits, although I am not convinced of the legitimacy of the sources! However, the few health benefits listed have nothing to do with being an athlete, or nothing that would help them; for instance reducing Gallstones, reducing risk of diabetes etc. Mental health could be a good one, but it's not directly relevant to an athlete. There are plenty stories of sportsmen struggling with mental health issues, but drink is often a cause. I would love to read a good source that details the benefits to an athlete, if you could point me in the right direction?

 

Perhaps I would revise my statement by suggesting it maybe is beneficial in moderation in some instances, but I still do not think it is beneficial in general -- at least not as beneficial as not drinking -- to an athletes performance.

 

 

 

Well, if I take my premise that alcohol is not beneficial to an athletes performance, then I think it demonstrates an inability to refrain from such a substance, which IMO is a "lax attitude."

 

Again, perhaps I am being excessively strict here, but I just do not like to see it in a professional athlete. An athlete should be committed to a strict regime in order to achieve peak physical performance. I do not think alcohol consumption is conducive to such a goal. It may have benefits to a degree, but I don't think they directly improve an athletes physical condition. As a general rule athletes should not drink, but perhaps some may need to be prescribed alcohol for a certain symptom, but that would only be to combat a deficiency which inhibits his/her ability to reach peak physical performance. Can you agree with that?

Alcohol is one of the most neurotoxic and destructive substances on the planet, perhaps it does have some advantages in very small doses but the research into that tends to be quite limited/varied and I have never seen any research saying it can be advantageous for an athlete. I have seen overwhelming evidence saying to the contrary. Research generally suggests one or two units can have benefits, does anyone seriously believe that is what the players were drinking on their night out?

 

Joe Hart and James Milner were out last year in Aberdeen, I know for a fact they were out until after 3AM, does anyone seriously think they were having minuscule amounts of alcohol? This was just a few days before a match. This is a major problem with British footballers, it is ingrained in our culture.

 

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sport/football/article-2792881/joe-hart-james-milner-pictured-aberdeen-ahead-manchester-city-return.html

 

PS - 'prescribed alcohol for a certain symptom'...haha what?

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Alcohol is one of the most neurotoxic and destructive substances on the planet, perhaps it does have some advantages in very small doses but the research into that tends to be quite limited/varied and I have never seen any research saying it can be advantageous for an athlete. I have seen overwhelming evidence saying to the contrary. Research generally suggests one or two units can have benefits, does anyone seriously believe that is what the players were drinking on their night out?

 

Comedy gold, the straw man strikes again! Or are you working for the temperance movement?

 

I think you're probably getting mixed up with Botox, which is actually the most lethal toxin known to man. You know, the one people inject into their faces... Or do you really think we've destroyed the planet with alcohol and everyone who drinks has massive brain damage?

 

You know, FOOD in high quantities causes a whole load of health hazards: obesity, diabetes, heart disease and even cancer among a load of other diseases. In high doses it is highly detrimental to an athlete's performance - should athletes refrain from eating food?

 

The point is that just because something is harmful in what would be considered high doses, it doesn't mean it is as detrimental in much smaller doses. In the west we have actually evolved to drink alcohol, our bodies are "designed" to cope. A couple of drinks of an evening will leave almost no trace the next day as your liver processes it overnight. You can live a long, healthy life by doing that a few nights a week and studies show you might have a lower chance of dementia because of it.

 

If you look up alcohol with relation to sports performance, there will be very little about having a few drinks before a day off. All the stuff you will find is about drinking the night before a competition or hard training day - and usually that will be about having several units or more. Or it will be about the long term effects of drinking all the time. Even then there is not much caution given for having one glass of red with a meal before a non-competition day.

 

And remember, there is not much real scientific research been done for this yet. Most of it is taking medical research into binge drinking out of context, and mixing it with anecdotal memories of struggling with a hangover.

 

Alcohol can have adverse effects: it dehydrates you, lowers your glucose levels, disturbs your sleep, gives you cravings for unhealthy food, and lowers your testosterone among other things. All this can easily be reversed on a day off.

 

If it's so neurotoxic and destructive then why did the BMC cycling team, celebrate their team time trial win in the Tour with glass of champagne, the night before another stage?

 

It's obvious that getting pissed will not be good for a footballer, but it's also obvious to most people who have done a bit of sport and enjoys a drink, that one night a week of say four pints followed by a day off, is hardly going to be much of a blip on their career radar.

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As I take an interested in this kind of stuff, I've looked around and skimmed a few scholarly articles. The problem as I said before, is the relevance is low as it's usually about continual heavy drinking, or primarily about the "hangover effect" of having drinking the night before training or a competition/match.

 

For the latter, there seems to be little effect on anaerobic performance but does have an effect on aerobic capacity. How much depended on a multitude of factors relating to the specific person - including how "used to alcohol" they were. However, the conclusions also consistently stated that the effects could last "for several hours after the ingestion of alcohol".

 

So having a few before a rest day does not seem to be highly significant.

 

I found a pretty simple (non scholarly), balanced and reasonably relevant article here:

http://www.runnersworld.com/fuel-school/can-a-drink-hurt-my-running-performance

 

Can a Drink Hurt My Running Performance?

 

"A drink" won't have much of an effect. Many drinks, however, can hurt your performance.

ByPamela Nisevich Bede, M.S., R.D. Tuesday, May 21, 2013, 12:00 am

 

After a hard day at the office, I enjoy a beer as I relax and unwind. I’m not a heavy drinker, but I’m in training for a 10-K, and I was wondering if a drink now and then might hurt my performance?

 

Alcohol continues to be the most frequently consumed drug among athletes and habitual exercisers alike, so you’re not the first person to ask this question! Obviously, the impact of heavy drinking during training (or any time of the year) can be drastic, but do the health benefits of moderate ethanol intake outweigh the risks?

 

First of all, we should define moderate intake. Moderate intake is loosely defined as consumption of fewer than three standard drinks* of alcohol per day, and research has found that this level of intake may offer health benefits. These benefits include positively affecting cholesterol levels, potentially protecting bones from thinning, and—depending on your drink of choice—supplying the diet with antioxidants, minerals, and vitamins. Levels exceeding moderate can be directly linked to the rate of injury sustained in sports events (think of fraternity flag football contests) and appear to induce detrimental effects on exercise capacity.

 

Clearly, there are some folks who should completely avoid imbibing: anyone with a history of alcohol abuse or any coexisting conditions, such those at risk for a stroke; individuals on medication (check with your doctor to see if there is an interaction between alcohol and your prescription); those with altered liver function or cirrhosis of the liver; those with altered or elevated triglyceride levels; and women who are pregnant. Runners with Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes should be cautious, as alcohol intake can cause hypoglycemia.

 

If you’re vying for a spot on the podium, you might want to abstain while in training. Various studies suggest that alcohol intake leads to dehydration (anyone who has ever suffered from a hangover knows this), decreases uptake of glucose and amino acids by the skeletal muscles, adversely affects the body’s energy supply, and impairs metabolic processes during exercise.

 

While some runners swear that a few beers the night before a race helps their performance, the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) does not wholeheartedly agree. ACSM issued the following guidelines on the effects of alcohol, stating: “Psychomotor skills are adversely affected by acute alcohol consumption; maximal aerobic power as assessed by VO2max is minimally influenced with acute alcohol consumption; acute alcohol ingestion is not associated with improvement in exercise capacity and may decrease performance levels; the consumption of alcohol may perturb the body’s temperature regulation mechanisms during exercises particularly in a cold environment.”

 

So while moderate alcohol intake may positively affect health, this impact is no greater than benefits found with regular exercise. Personally, I’m a realist and not a purist, so if you’re not competing for an Olympic bid, you don’t have confounding health factors, and you enjoy the taste of red wine with your steak, well then, cheers! But if you’re looking to improve performance, it is unlikely that alcohol consumption will be prescribed or promoted anytime soon.

 

*What is considered “one drink”? A drink is equal to approximately 12 ounces of beer, 5 ounces of wine, or 1.5 ounces of distilled spirits.

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Comedy gold, the straw man strikes again! Or are you working for the temperance movement?

 

I think you're probably getting mixed up with Botox, which is actually the most lethal toxin known to man. You know, the one people inject into their faces... Or do you really think we've destroyed the planet with alcohol and everyone who drinks has massive brain damage?

 

You know, FOOD in high quantities causes a whole load of health hazards: obesity, diabetes, heart disease and even cancer among a load of other diseases. In high doses it is highly detrimental to an athlete's performance - should athletes refrain from eating food?

 

The point is that just because something is harmful in what would be considered high doses, it doesn't mean it is as detrimental in much smaller doses. In the west we have actually evolved to drink alcohol, our bodies are "designed" to cope. A couple of drinks of an evening will leave almost no trace the next day as your liver processes it overnight. You can live a long, healthy life by doing that a few nights a week and studies show you might have a lower chance of dementia because of it.

 

If you look up alcohol with relation to sports performance, there will be very little about having a few drinks before a day off. All the stuff you will find is about drinking the night before a competition or hard training day - and usually that will be about having several units or more. Or it will be about the long term effects of drinking all the time. Even then there is not much caution given for having one glass of red with a meal before a non-competition day.

 

And remember, there is not much real scientific research been done for this yet. Most of it is taking medical research into binge drinking out of context, and mixing it with anecdotal memories of struggling with a hangover.

 

Alcohol can have adverse effects: it dehydrates you, lowers your glucose levels, disturbs your sleep, gives you cravings for unhealthy food, and lowers your testosterone among other things. All this can easily be reversed on a day off.

 

If it's so neurotoxic and destructive then why did the BMC cycling team, celebrate their team time trial win in the Tour with glass of champagne, the night before another stage?

 

It's obvious that getting pissed will not be good for a footballer, but it's also obvious to most people who have done a bit of sport and enjoys a drink, that one night a week of say four pints followed by a day off, is hardly going to be much of a blip on their career radar.

OK, my sincere apologies. Perhaps I should have qualified it with alcohol is one of the most neurotoxic and destructive substances that gets ingested by humans on a regular basis.

 

http://www.theguardian.com/science/2011/mar/07/safe-level-alcohol-consumption

 

To repeat my original point, British footballers clearly lag behind their continental counterparts. This is displayed both at club level and internationally. The poor nutrition/conditioning and booze culture are, in my opinion, key factors which contribute towards this. Poor coaching techniques, outdated ideology, insufficient kids regularly competing in footballer being other important factors.

Edited by Ser Barristan Selmy
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