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Being able to run a £13.3 bn deficit and have your neighbour pay it off every year ... how's that for a benefit of union. Who thinks Nikla's chums in Brussels would do the same?

 

Except our neighbour doesn't pay it off every year.

 

" The UK was hit by recession in 2008 following the financial crisis, and to cover its outgoings the government had to borrow a record £154bn in 2009.

 

By the time the coalition took over in 2010 that had fallen slightly to £144bn, equivalent to 9.9% of GDP.

 

The new Chancellor of the Exchequer, George Osborne, announced an austerity package of tax rises and swingeing spending cuts in his June 2010 budget.

 

He vowed to balance Britain's books within five years - a promise that was to cause him a lot of trouble.

 

While the deficit did fall by almost half by 2015, it was still nearly £80bn for the year.

 

Philip Hammond took over as chancellor in 2016 and has seen the deficit fall further.

 

For the financial year to the end of March 2017, the deficit was £52bn or 2.6% of GDP. "

 

Every person in the UK continues to carry more and more government debt.

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In analysis that paints a stark picture of inequality in Britain, The Equality Trust found that the richest 10 per cent of households have an average pre-tax income of £110,632 per year compared to just £19,992 for the poorest. "

 

That seems very low, particularly when you consider that most of these households will have 2 earners.

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Except our neighbour doesn't pay it off every year.

 

" The UK was hit by recession in 2008 following the financial crisis, and to cover its outgoings the government had to borrow a record £154bn in 2009.

 

By the time the coalition took over in 2010 that had fallen slightly to £144bn, equivalent to 9.9% of GDP.

 

The new Chancellor of the Exchequer, George Osborne, announced an austerity package of tax rises and swingeing spending cuts in his June 2010 budget.

 

He vowed to balance Britain's books within five years - a promise that was to cause him a lot of trouble.

 

While the deficit did fall by almost half by 2015, it was still nearly £80bn for the year.

 

Philip Hammond took over as chancellor in 2016 and has seen the deficit fall further.

 

For the financial year to the end of March 2017, the deficit was £52bn or 2.6% of GDP. "

 

Every person in the UK continues to carry more and more government debt.

Not one word of which changes the reality that Scotland ran a deficit of £13.3bn in 2016-17 and had the entire slate wiped clean by those nasty people in Westminster.

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Not one word of which changes the reality that Scotland ran a deficit of £13.3bn in 2016-17 and had the entire slate wiped clean by those nasty people in Westminster.

 

Except it wasn't wiped clean though, was it ?

Do you so quickly forget the figures pulled out that the Scottish people would have to pay as their share of UK debt before the referendum ?

The Scots debt is part of the larger UK debt.

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Except it wasn't wiped clean though, was it ?

Do you so quickly forget the figures pulled out that the Scottish people would have to pay as their share of UK debt before the referendum ?

The Scots debt is part of the larger UK debt.

 

You’re dealing with people who don’t know the difference between a devolved government and a Independent nation.

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Except it wasn't wiped clean though, was it ?

Do you so quickly forget the figures pulled out that the Scottish people would have to pay as their share of UK debt before the referendum ?

The Scots debt is part of the larger UK debt.

 

Hey, now you're getting it ... it's a UK debt. And the fact remains, Scotland spends more than it raises in revenues, runs a huge deficit and at the end of the year has no debt. There is no Scottish debt, that's the point. Speculating about what would happen in the unlikely event of independence is just a silly diversion.

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Hey, now you're getting it ... it's a UK debt. And the fact remains, Scotland spends more than it raises in revenues, runs a huge deficit and at the end of the year has no debt. There is no Scottish debt, that's the point. Speculating about what would happen in the unlikely event of independence is just a silly diversion.

 

The UK runs a huge deficit every year as shown in the post I made.

The UK still has that debt in exactly the same way that Scotland as part of the UK is responsible for its part of that debt.

Oh, I "get it" alright. It's a pity that you don't.

Edited by boabie
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The UK runs a huge deficit every year as shown in the post I made.

The UK still has that debt in exactly the same way that Scotland as part of the UK is responsible for its part of that debt.

Oh, I "get it" alright. It's a pity that you don't.

 

The important points are thus:

 

The per head deficit of Scotland is greater than the per head deficit of the UK.

 

The UK will tolerate a higher Scottish per head deficit than the EU ever will.

 

You may not like the austerity measures imposed by the UK government, but they're as nothing compared to the austerity measures imposed by the EU (on Greece, for example).

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The important points are thus:

 

The per head deficit of Scotland is greater than the per head deficit of the UK.

 

The UK will tolerate a higher Scottish per head deficit than the EU ever will.

 

You may not like the austerity measures imposed by the UK government, but they're as nothing compared to the austerity measures imposed by the EU (on Greece, for example).

 

All pertinent points conveniently ignored by the Nats.

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The important points are thus:

 

The per head deficit of Scotland is greater than the per head deficit of the UK.

 

The UK will tolerate a higher Scottish per head deficit than the EU ever will.

 

You may not like the austerity measures imposed by the UK government, but they're as nothing compared to the austerity measures imposed by the EU (on Greece, for example).

 

No. The important part is that Bill says the deficit debt in Scotland is written off by Westminster. It isn't. Scotland still owns part of the UK deficit debt.

The per head deficit in Scotland is not due to any extravagance being perpetuated here. It is because we have so few folk within a relatively large land mass. If Westminster don't like that fact they have the simple decision to take - cut Scotland off.

Mate, I voted No in the referendum. To stay in the UK.

I voted to stay in the EU but that was only because I foresaw the problems May is facing right now and wouldn't trust Boris or Gove to run an honest raffle. The promise of us being better off by leaving isn't even a myth. It's a downright lie. Wait until things like the money markets in London start being moved abroad and you'll see.

I've no argument with UK austerity. It's not only Scotland being affected. The folks in England are suffering too.

Where guys like Bill fall down is, if somebody isn't as rabid as he is then they must be a kilt wearing nat. His default is sarcasm or outright nastiness as witnessed by his remarks to posters like the Barrhead fellow. I could see the point if any of his procrastinations were true. But he never backs them up with debate, he just switches to abuse. It isn't right and shouldn't be tolerated.

Edited by boabie
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