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Coronavirus and the political situation


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1 hour ago, ChelseaBoy said:

I do think there has been a massive over count on Covid deaths as it is classed as a Covid death even if the patient was already dying from an existing condition. Of course there have been cases of death from Covid directly without any comorbidity, but in the under 65s this is so minimal as to be statistically insignificant. 

It's never as straightforward as we'd like it to be. What if Covid doesn't kill someone but they later die of something else as a direct result of being weakened by Covid. Is that "of", "with" or "due to"?

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My wife and I have known eight people who have died as a result of covid all aged sixty plus three had underlying conditions but the other five just didn't have the strength to recover. 

And in America at present the death rate is currently running at around 2500 per day .

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So it looks like Sturgeon and Drakenfold have been talking out of their arses as we suspected with the dodgy statistics for political gain.

 

The Spectator:

 

Today is England’s last day under Plan B restrictions, brought in by the government at the beginning of last month to curb the spread of Omicron. Work-from-home guidance was scrapped last week, while mandatory face coverings in shops and on public transport — as well as the need to show vaccine passports at large venues — are to be lifted tomorrow.

Was there any point in these restrictions in the first place? We will never know, of course, what would have happened had the government not brought them in — no one has conducted a controlled experiment on an identical England where Plan B was never introduced.


But what we can do is to compare Covid death rates in England, where most restrictions were lifted on 19 July until Plan B came in last month, with death rates in Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland, where tougher restrictions outlasted those in England. In Scotland, the mask mandate was never lifted. Vaccine passports for large venues were introduced in the country on 1 October last year, in Wales on 11 October and in Northern Ireland on 29 November. On work-from-home guidance (reintroduced last month), Wales was militant — it became a criminal offence to go to work if you could feasibly do your job at home. Northern Ireland retained restrictions on the number of people who could meet indoors.

 

And the results? Since 19 July, England has had 21,098 Covid deaths — a rate of 37.3 per 100,000 people. Wales had 1,195, a rate of 37.7, Scotland had 2,422, a rate of 44.3 and Northern Ireland had 914, a rate of 48.2.

 

There are many factors behind Covid deaths, of course, and socioeconomic conditions are different in each of the four UK nations (although thanks to its larger conurbations you might have thought England was most vulnerable). But the figures certainly don’t suggest that Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland have gained anything through implementing tighter rules on face masks, social gatherings, vaccine passports, working from home etc. — indeed, in terms of death rate, they have come off worse. By implication, it is doubtful whether Plan B has had any beneficial effect on fighting Covid in England, either.

 

 

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59 minutes ago, Bill said:

It's never as straightforward as we'd like it to be. What if Covid doesn't kill someone but they later die of something else as a direct result of being weakened by Covid. Is that "of", "with" or "due to"?

Those deaths are currently counted under the 28 days following a Covid positive test i think?

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I'm absolutely bricking it from Covid.  The 0.00something death rate keeps me awake at night.

 

That's why I only cross the road at traffic lights and drink and eat what I'm told is safe by governments and scientists too.  

 

#staysafe

#makelifeboring

#dontsocialiseorhavefun

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21 minutes ago, ChelseaBoy said:

Those deaths are currently counted under the 28 days following a Covid positive test i think?

Yes but do the actual causes of death include Covid ... would they be bona fide Covid deaths. My point is that there are bound to be many marginal cases where it is flay out impossible to be sure whether or not Covid played a genuine role in someone's death.

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16 hours ago, ChelseaBoy said:

So it looks like Sturgeon and Drakenfold have been talking out of their arses as we suspected with the dodgy statistics for political gain.

 

The Spectator:

 

Today is England’s last day under Plan B restrictions, brought in by the government at the beginning of last month to curb the spread of Omicron. Work-from-home guidance was scrapped last week, while mandatory face coverings in shops and on public transport — as well as the need to show vaccine passports at large venues — are to be lifted tomorrow.

Was there any point in these restrictions in the first place? We will never know, of course, what would have happened had the government not brought them in — no one has conducted a controlled experiment on an identical England where Plan B was never introduced.


But what we can do is to compare Covid death rates in England, where most restrictions were lifted on 19 July until Plan B came in last month, with death rates in Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland, where tougher restrictions outlasted those in England. In Scotland, the mask mandate was never lifted. Vaccine passports for large venues were introduced in the country on 1 October last year, in Wales on 11 October and in Northern Ireland on 29 November. On work-from-home guidance (reintroduced last month), Wales was militant — it became a criminal offence to go to work if you could feasibly do your job at home. Northern Ireland retained restrictions on the number of people who could meet indoors.

 

And the results? Since 19 July, England has had 21,098 Covid deaths — a rate of 37.3 per 100,000 people. Wales had 1,195, a rate of 37.7, Scotland had 2,422, a rate of 44.3 and Northern Ireland had 914, a rate of 48.2.

 

There are many factors behind Covid deaths, of course, and socioeconomic conditions are different in each of the four UK nations (although thanks to its larger conurbations you might have thought England was most vulnerable). But the figures certainly don’t suggest that Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland have gained anything through implementing tighter rules on face masks, social gatherings, vaccine passports, working from home etc. — indeed, in terms of death rate, they have come off worse. By implication, it is doubtful whether Plan B has had any beneficial effect on fighting Covid in England, either.

Not only are Sturgeon and Drakeford talking out of their arses but we know that they know that we know it, the upshot of which is that they neither have any basis for their restrictions nor do they care one iota that we know it.  There are more than enough compliant fools and fearful people in Scotland to allow Sturgeon to bully and take the piss with absolute impunity. And just in case any of them might accidentally wake up to what's going on, we have our daily dose of Partygate, etc to keep them snuggly comatose.

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37 minutes ago, forlanssister said:

When you look at the state of politics currently worldwide it makes you wonder if Pol Pot got a fair crack of the whip.

Superb comment

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