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"Dozens of military personnel including nurses, medics, troops and drivers will be deployed to Scottish hospitals struggling under “unprecedented pressures” from treatment backlogs."

"The move follows the deployment of military personnel to help the Scottish Ambulance Service."

 

The British Army, paid by the British Government, I assume. 

 

Covid in Scotland: Military brought in to help Scottish hospitals facing backlogs

Helen Puttick, Scottish Health Correspondent

Friday October 15 2021, 5.00pm, The Times

 

The move follows the deployment of military personnel to help the Scottish Ambulance Service

 

https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/covid-in-scotland-military-brought-in-to-help-scottish-hospitals-facing-backlogs-k2k7mvh7x

 

Dozens of military personnel including nurses, medics, troops and drivers will be deployed to Scottish hospitals struggling under “unprecedented pressures” from treatment backlogs.

NHS Lanarkshire and NHS Borders have both asked the forces to help them manage patients with Covid-19, a surge in patients with other serious problems, and a lack of doctors, nurses and other professionals. The military has already been deployed to help the Scottish Ambulance Service because waiting times for ambulances have spiralled.

In Lanarkshire 63 personnel will be drafted in to the three hospitals including 45 medics, three nurses and three drivers. In the Borders 14 medics, two nurses and four additional troops will be assisting. They are due to start work next week and continue their support into early November.

Judith Park, director of acute services for NHS Lanarkshire, said the health board was “experiencing significant pressure” due to Covid admissions and a build-up of treatments during the pandemic. “We are taking a range of steps to introduce additional capacity in order to help with the unprecedented pressures on our health and care system,” she said.

“Staff shortages because of Covid-19 are affecting bed capacity and the approval of temporary military assistance on our hospital sites is very welcome over the next few weeks as we begin to see winter illnesses circulate alongside Covid adding to the pressures we face.”

 

Dr Sandesh Gulhane, a GP and Scottish Conservative health spokesman, said the SNP had denied accusations of a crisis in the Scottish NHS despite staff becoming increasingly overwhelmed.

“This support from our UK armed forces is hugely welcome, but Humza Yousaf [the health secretary] should have been on top of this situation immediately,” he said. “We aren’t even into the peak winter period, yet my colleagues on the front line are already well beyond breaking point.

“The consequences of Humza Yousaf’s flimsy NHS Recovery Plan and belated winter plan are now being keenly felt by staff and patients every single day. He has been too busy getting photo ops rather than giving our health boards the resources they require.”

Delays in Scotland’s accident and emergency departments have been running at record levels for weeks and emergency doctors say they are seeing unusually high numbers of patients who are seriously ill and require beds.

Yousaf said the NHS would have to cope with traditional viruses such as flu spreading this winter compounding the pressure from Covid-19 as, unlike last year, people are allowed to socialise.

“The NHS is experiencing significant pressure at the moment because of Covid-19 admissions and the backlog in care built up during the pandemic and we are taking a range of steps to introduce additional capacity in order to help with the unprecedented pressures on the health and care system,” he said.

“Earlier this month we announced a record winter package funding of £300 million to support a range of measures to maximise capacity in our hospitals and primary care, reduce delayed discharges, improve pay for social care staff, and ensure those in the community who need support receive effective and responsive care.”

Brigadier Ben Wrench, commander of the joint military command in Scotland, said: “The armed forces in Scotland, as always, stand ready to support civil society in Scotland and the rest of the UK. The ability of trained military healthcare professionals and their support team to deploy at short notice and provide short-term support to cover a critical gap shows the utility of the armed forces and the strength of the ongoing relationship with partner civilian organisations.”

 

Alister Jack, the Scottish secretary, said: “Our fantastic British armed forces are playing a key role in helping Scotland’s health services at this challenging time.”

Jackie Baillie, Scottish Labour’s health spokeswoman, praised the assistance but said it showed the NHS was “spiralling ever further out of control”. She added: “We need a robust national action plan to ease pressures across the country, not drawing down troops health board by health board as the crisis spreads. That means field hospitals to ease the pressure on the NHS and the adoption of a 30-minute ambulance turnaround time to save lives.”

Both health boards welcomed the military aid.

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1 hour ago, Uilleam said:

"Dozens of military personnel including nurses, medics, troops and drivers will be deployed to Scottish hospitals struggling under “unprecedented pressures” from treatment backlogs."

"The move follows the deployment of military personnel to help the Scottish Ambulance Service."

 

The British Army, paid by the British Government, I assume. 

 

Covid in Scotland: Military brought in to help Scottish hospitals facing backlogs

Helen Puttick, Scottish Health Correspondent

Friday October 15 2021, 5.00pm, The Times

 

The move follows the deployment of military personnel to help the Scottish Ambulance Service

 

https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/covid-in-scotland-military-brought-in-to-help-scottish-hospitals-facing-backlogs-k2k7mvh7x

 

Dozens of military personnel including nurses, medics, troops and drivers will be deployed to Scottish hospitals struggling under “unprecedented pressures” from treatment backlogs.

NHS Lanarkshire and NHS Borders have both asked the forces to help them manage patients with Covid-19, a surge in patients with other serious problems, and a lack of doctors, nurses and other professionals. The military has already been deployed to help the Scottish Ambulance Service because waiting times for ambulances have spiralled.

In Lanarkshire 63 personnel will be drafted in to the three hospitals including 45 medics, three nurses and three drivers. In the Borders 14 medics, two nurses and four additional troops will be assisting. They are due to start work next week and continue their support into early November.

Judith Park, director of acute services for NHS Lanarkshire, said the health board was “experiencing significant pressure” due to Covid admissions and a build-up of treatments during the pandemic. “We are taking a range of steps to introduce additional capacity in order to help with the unprecedented pressures on our health and care system,” she said.

“Staff shortages because of Covid-19 are affecting bed capacity and the approval of temporary military assistance on our hospital sites is very welcome over the next few weeks as we begin to see winter illnesses circulate alongside Covid adding to the pressures we face.”

 

Dr Sandesh Gulhane, a GP and Scottish Conservative health spokesman, said the SNP had denied accusations of a crisis in the Scottish NHS despite staff becoming increasingly overwhelmed.

“This support from our UK armed forces is hugely welcome, but Humza Yousaf [the health secretary] should have been on top of this situation immediately,” he said. “We aren’t even into the peak winter period, yet my colleagues on the front line are already well beyond breaking point.

“The consequences of Humza Yousaf’s flimsy NHS Recovery Plan and belated winter plan are now being keenly felt by staff and patients every single day. He has been too busy getting photo ops rather than giving our health boards the resources they require.”

Delays in Scotland’s accident and emergency departments have been running at record levels for weeks and emergency doctors say they are seeing unusually high numbers of patients who are seriously ill and require beds.

Yousaf said the NHS would have to cope with traditional viruses such as flu spreading this winter compounding the pressure from Covid-19 as, unlike last year, people are allowed to socialise.

“The NHS is experiencing significant pressure at the moment because of Covid-19 admissions and the backlog in care built up during the pandemic and we are taking a range of steps to introduce additional capacity in order to help with the unprecedented pressures on the health and care system,” he said.

“Earlier this month we announced a record winter package funding of £300 million to support a range of measures to maximise capacity in our hospitals and primary care, reduce delayed discharges, improve pay for social care staff, and ensure those in the community who need support receive effective and responsive care.”

Brigadier Ben Wrench, commander of the joint military command in Scotland, said: “The armed forces in Scotland, as always, stand ready to support civil society in Scotland and the rest of the UK. The ability of trained military healthcare professionals and their support team to deploy at short notice and provide short-term support to cover a critical gap shows the utility of the armed forces and the strength of the ongoing relationship with partner civilian organisations.”

 

Alister Jack, the Scottish secretary, said: “Our fantastic British armed forces are playing a key role in helping Scotland’s health services at this challenging time.”

Jackie Baillie, Scottish Labour’s health spokeswoman, praised the assistance but said it showed the NHS was “spiralling ever further out of control”. She added: “We need a robust national action plan to ease pressures across the country, not drawing down troops health board by health board as the crisis spreads. That means field hospitals to ease the pressure on the NHS and the adoption of a 30-minute ambulance turnaround time to save lives.”

Both health boards welcomed the military aid.

If they stopped the waste had less chiefs more workers the health service could cope but as long as we waste money on it it will just get worse, many doctors and consultants also work in the private sector it should be one or the other a dog cant have two masters. 

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Angus Robertson is getting a lot of coverage in today's Times. 

Too much, I fear, although any coverage is too much, in my very humble opinion.

 

Regardless, if you think that this, below, is the stuff of fantasy, read the "Saturday Interview", which I kindly post, too. 

 

Good Friday agreement ‘sets precedent for new referendum’

Magnus Linklater

Saturday October 16 2021, 12.01am, The Times

 

https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/good-friday-agreement-sets-precedent-for-new-referendum-jgckh997g

 

The case for a second referendum on Scottish independence is bolstered by a key section of Good Friday agreement which details circumstances that would pave the way for a border poll, according to a leading SNP minister.

Angus Robertson, cabinet secretary for the constitution, said that the 1998 agreement in Northern Ireland contained a commitment to hold a border poll on uniting the country if a majority of voters wanted one.

He argued that, by electing an SNP government committed to a second independence referendum, the Scottish people had shown their support for another vote.

“As we know from agreements elsewhere in the UK, for example Northern Ireland, the issue of the border poll is integral to the Good Friday agreement,” he said.

Robertson argued that the agreement — which gives the secretary of state for Northern Ireland the power to hold a border poll if they consider a majority of voters want one — specified a seven-year period between one vote and the next.

 

“I think in that case, there is a requirement of a wait for seven years after any vote, should the people wish to consider and have another vote,” Robertson told The Times. “I observe that the distance between 2014 [the date of the last independence referendum] and 2021 is seven years.”

He said there should be no need to fight the case for a referendum in the courts because the 2014 Edinburgh agreement, when David Cameron gave approval for a second vote, set a precedent, which should be followed again. “We have a precedent in the arrangements that were reached in the 2014 referendum,” he said. “I hope the issue of the referendum ends with the recognition by the UK government that people have voted for [it] and to respect that vote, given that the UK is a voluntary union,” he said.

Robertson confirmed that arrangements were in hand for a referendum, as promised by the SNP, in the second half of the parliamentary term.

“We are working on a timetable of holding a referendum in the course of 2023,” he said, “and that is what I intend to do as cabinet secretary for the constitution.”

Robertson said that there was no question of Nicola Sturgeon standing down before the next election, despite a bet placed by Douglas Ross, the Scottish Conservative leader, that she would no longer be leading the party by 2026.

“I don’t think she is going to step down,” he said. “She is going to lead the Scottish government through the independence referendum campaign. She will be the first prime minister of an independent Scotland.”

Robertson, who has written a book about Vienna, where he worked as a journalist before returning to become a nationalist MP in 2001, said an independent Scotland would play a leading role in Europe, and act as a bridge between the UK, Scandinavia and the EU. He also insisted that voters had demonstrated a clear mandate for independence.

“Point to a single European country in the mainstream of politics where the governing party is polling in the fifties,” he said. “There isn’t one. Let’s reflect reality here. The SNP is by any measure among the most successful political parties in the whole of Europe. And over the last year we have seen sustained support for Scottish independence, up to 56 per cent at one stage.”

He added: “We have to, through persuasion and discourse with as yet unpersuaded neighbours and friends, build the growing support which exists in favour of independence.

 

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" ‘Like Austria, an independent Scotland could be a bridge-builder for Europe’ "

 

I thought the model was Norway; then it was Denmark; now it's Austria. (Moving further and further East, I note. Should I be worried?)

As I've said before, it's never Slovakia, is it.

 

"Robertson’s enthusiasm stems from his own background. Born to a Scottish father and German mother, he was brought up speaking German.."

 

Crikey, Just imagine if his mother -sorry, his birthing parent in ScotGov cant- was not German, but, oh, say, Albanian......

 

This means nothing to me, Oh Tirana!!

 

 

THE SATURDAY INTERVIEW

‘Like Austria, an independent Scotland could be a bridge-builder for Europe’

Angus Robertson, the constitution secretary, says that Vienna’s reinvention serves as a model for his country to follow

Magnus Linklater

Saturday October 16 2021, 12.01am, The Times

 

 

Angus Robertson has a vision of Scotland. It is based on his enduring affection for Vienna. Here, he says, is a city that emerged from world wars and a collapsed empire, to reinvent itself as an international crossroads — a place where diplomacy and discourse took the place of Habsburg potentates and Nazi purges.

As the SNP’s constitution secretary, responsible for external affairs, Robertson would like to see an independent Scotland doing something similar: becoming a link between its UK neighbours to the south, its Scandinavian partners to the north, and the European Union, to which it would once again belong.

“There is no point becoming a sovereign state unless you are wanting to do something with the powers of statehood, the powers of international relations, the opportunities of diplomacy and co-operation,” he says. “I think Scotland has the potential role as a bridge-builder. This is a direct parallel with Austria.”

Robertson’s enthusiasm stems from his own background. Born to a Scottish father and German mother, he was brought up speaking German fluently, and spent ten years in Vienna, working as a journalist for the Austrian Broadcasting Corporation, the BBC and the World Service. He might still be there had it not been for the advent of the Scottish parliament. He had joined the SNP at the age of 15, and followed the 1997 referendum on Scottish devolution with excitement.

“I wanted to be a part of that in one way or another,” he says. “I remember flying back from Vienna to attend SNP branch meetings to try and get selected as a candidate for the initial elections.”

 

At first unsuccessful, he was elected as a Westminster MP for Moray in 2001, a seat he held until 2017, when he was defeated by the current Scottish Tory leader, Douglas Ross. In the wilderness until his election to the Scottish parliament as member for Edinburgh Central, he went back to Vienna to research a book about the city. The result, Vienna: The International Capital, has just been published.

“I had always been looking for a book [about Vienna] and could never find it, because it’s never been written in English or in German,” he explains. “You can buy fantastic books about Austria and the Hapsburgs, Vienna and Mozart, Vienna and Hitler, but you haven’t until today been able to buy a book on Vienna as an international capital.”

He says the only other external minister to have done so is the former US secretary of state Henry Kissinger, whose doctoral thesis was on the Congress of Vienna, held in 1815 after the defeat of Napoleon. Both Kissinger and Robertson have been guest lecturers at the Diplomatic Academy of Vienna.

“At the heart of the book is the idea that Vienna is the home to modern diplomacy,” he says. “Its rules were first codified and agreed at the Congress of Vienna.”

One of the few SNP figures with a genuine hinterland, Robertson takes readers on a journey through Vienna’s history at the heart of the Habsburg dynasty and the Holy Roman Empire (“Neither holy, Roman nor an empire,” as Voltaire wrote derisively, though it held power for a millennium.) A place of great music, grand state balls and political intrigue, Vienna’s cast list includes Mozart, the Empress Maria Theresa and Klemens von Metternich, as well as Trotsky, Tito and Adolf Hitler.

Robertson describes the dark side of Vienna, with a history of antisemitism that came to a head after Hitler’s rise, and the Anschluss in 1938 when Germany annexed Austria and instituted a pogrom that led to the death of more 60,000 Jews.

“It is true, and must be acknowledged, that there’s been a strong stain of antisemitism, particularly in the second half of 19th century and later during the time of Nazi rule, after the Anschluss,” he says. “But it is also a city that trailblazed public policy under the social democrats, when it was known as Red Vienna, building homes after the First World War, to become the second biggest public landlords in the world after the People’s Republic of China.”

Austria, he says, has taken in more refugees since the Second World War than any other nation in Europe, suggesting a tolerance that is at odds with the anti-immigration policy of its right-wing Freedom Party — the third largest in the country.

 

“The populous right in Austria have consistently campaigned against immigration, and they use lurid and xenophobic language and imagery to prey on people’s fears and to whip up hysteria about people of other backgrounds, particularly anti-Islamic,” he says.

“There are lessons to be learnt about populism and the weaponising of themes such as immigration — they are common trends in UK and Europe. In the UK there is a particular strain of British exceptionalism which seeks to claim that we in this island are not Europeans, when we are. We have decades of tabloid headlines that have fed a never-ending bilge of misleading anti-European propaganda.”

But doesn’t nationalism, which Robertson espouses, actually foster the idea of barriers and boundaries? He disagrees.

“As with all isms, there are different forms. While British nationalism is about putting up barriers, mainstream Scottish nationalism is about being part of a wider world — particularly as a European nation and also as a nation in the British isles where those of us who support Scottish independence look forward to having a relationship as equals with the other home nations.”

He says it was the Brexiteers who put up the barriers and cut Britain off from the rest of the Europe. I wondered, however, whether the Scots were any more enthusiastic about EU control from Brussels than the rest of the UK. Indeed, Robertson himself, back in 2007, favoured a referendum on the Lisbon Treaty, arguing that it gave the EU too much control over Scottish fishing rights.

“You’re missing the most important element of all this,” he replies, “which is whether you have any agency in it. At the present we have no agency in Brexit and no agency in Europe. So we are bobbing along in a sea of Boris Johnson’s Brexit making, as opposed to being a part of a process where we would be represented, and where we would have a lot to offer.”

Why then are the Scots still apparently unconvinced by the idea of independence? Robertson laughs.

 

“Point to a single European country in the mainstream of politics where the governing party is polling in the fifties,” he demands. “There isn’t one. Let’s reflect reality here. The SNP is by any measure among the most successful political parties in the whole of Europe. And over the last year we have seen sustained support for Scottish independence, up to 56 per cent at one stage.”

The challenge now, he says, is to win over the unconverted. “We have to, through persuasion and discourse with as yet unpersuaded neighbours and friends, build the growing support which exists in favour of independence. I look forward to Scotland learning the lessons of what a reimagined small country with a significant capital in Vienna has managed to do, which is to emerge beyond the history, both good and bad, to redefine the city as it is in the 21st century.”

 

Quickfire

What is the book on your bedside table?
Vienna: The International Capital [by Angus Robertson]. I haven’t had time to read anything else.

What music would you take to your desert island?
A music streaming service so I could listen to everything.

What was the best advice you were ever given?
Accept the things I can’t change, the courage to change the things I can, and the wisdom to know the difference [the so-called Serenity Prayer, coined by the theologian Reinhold Niebuhr].

Snappy dresser or M&S?
Bit of everything. Home-working meant not wearing a suit, which was great.

A week off: box-set or walking the hills?
Walking the hills — in Scotland and the Austrian Alps.

Tell us a secret
Called up for international rugby squad for Austria. Never actually capped for the Steinbocks.

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8 hours ago, Uilleam said:

"Dozens of military personnel including nurses, medics, troops and drivers will be deployed to Scottish hospitals struggling under “unprecedented pressures” from treatment backlogs."

"The move follows the deployment of military personnel to help the Scottish Ambulance Service."

 

The British Army, paid by the British Government, I assume. 

 

Covid in Scotland: Military brought in to help Scottish hospitals facing backlogs

Helen Puttick, Scottish Health Correspondent

Friday October 15 2021, 5.00pm, The Times

 

The move follows the deployment of military personnel to help the Scottish Ambulance Service

 

https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/covid-in-scotland-military-brought-in-to-help-scottish-hospitals-facing-backlogs-k2k7mvh7x

 

Dozens of military personnel including nurses, medics, troops and drivers will be deployed to Scottish hospitals struggling under “unprecedented pressures” from treatment backlogs.

NHS Lanarkshire and NHS Borders have both asked the forces to help them manage patients with Covid-19, a surge in patients with other serious problems, and a lack of doctors, nurses and other professionals. The military has already been deployed to help the Scottish Ambulance Service because waiting times for ambulances have spiralled.

In Lanarkshire 63 personnel will be drafted in to the three hospitals including 45 medics, three nurses and three drivers. In the Borders 14 medics, two nurses and four additional troops will be assisting. They are due to start work next week and continue their support into early November.

Judith Park, director of acute services for NHS Lanarkshire, said the health board was “experiencing significant pressure” due to Covid admissions and a build-up of treatments during the pandemic. “We are taking a range of steps to introduce additional capacity in order to help with the unprecedented pressures on our health and care system,” she said.

“Staff shortages because of Covid-19 are affecting bed capacity and the approval of temporary military assistance on our hospital sites is very welcome over the next few weeks as we begin to see winter illnesses circulate alongside Covid adding to the pressures we face.”

 

Dr Sandesh Gulhane, a GP and Scottish Conservative health spokesman, said the SNP had denied accusations of a crisis in the Scottish NHS despite staff becoming increasingly overwhelmed.

“This support from our UK armed forces is hugely welcome, but Humza Yousaf [the health secretary] should have been on top of this situation immediately,” he said. “We aren’t even into the peak winter period, yet my colleagues on the front line are already well beyond breaking point.

“The consequences of Humza Yousaf’s flimsy NHS Recovery Plan and belated winter plan are now being keenly felt by staff and patients every single day. He has been too busy getting photo ops rather than giving our health boards the resources they require.”

Delays in Scotland’s accident and emergency departments have been running at record levels for weeks and emergency doctors say they are seeing unusually high numbers of patients who are seriously ill and require beds.

Yousaf said the NHS would have to cope with traditional viruses such as flu spreading this winter compounding the pressure from Covid-19 as, unlike last year, people are allowed to socialise.

“The NHS is experiencing significant pressure at the moment because of Covid-19 admissions and the backlog in care built up during the pandemic and we are taking a range of steps to introduce additional capacity in order to help with the unprecedented pressures on the health and care system,” he said.

“Earlier this month we announced a record winter package funding of £300 million to support a range of measures to maximise capacity in our hospitals and primary care, reduce delayed discharges, improve pay for social care staff, and ensure those in the community who need support receive effective and responsive care.”

Brigadier Ben Wrench, commander of the joint military command in Scotland, said: “The armed forces in Scotland, as always, stand ready to support civil society in Scotland and the rest of the UK. The ability of trained military healthcare professionals and their support team to deploy at short notice and provide short-term support to cover a critical gap shows the utility of the armed forces and the strength of the ongoing relationship with partner civilian organisations.”

 

Alister Jack, the Scottish secretary, said: “Our fantastic British armed forces are playing a key role in helping Scotland’s health services at this challenging time.”

Jackie Baillie, Scottish Labour’s health spokeswoman, praised the assistance but said it showed the NHS was “spiralling ever further out of control”. She added: “We need a robust national action plan to ease pressures across the country, not drawing down troops health board by health board as the crisis spreads. That means field hospitals to ease the pressure on the NHS and the adoption of a 30-minute ambulance turnaround time to save lives.”

Both health boards welcomed the military aid.

All gone quiet on the SNP front bench as they cannot stomach the fact that their incompetence has meant British military personnel are having to support a failing health service. No praise, no words of thanks. Yousaf shouldn't be alowed anywhere near a ministerial post, everthing he touches turns to shite.  

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2 minutes ago, ChelseaBoy said:

Yousaf shouldn't be alowed anywhere near a ministerial post, everthing he touches turns to shite.  

He thinks he is no small drink, but is out of his depth in every role: that takes talent, to be fair. 

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2 minutes ago, alexscottislegend said:

He is maybe Scotland's Gavin Williamson...

Maybe every government should have one.

 

Humza's only contribution to government, one which should not be underestimated, mind, is taking the bad face off the Supreme Leaderene.

 

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